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Savran

Posted by on 7-25-20

Ladyzhinka

Posted by on 7-11-20

Golovanevsk

Posted by on 5-28-20

Ushomir

Posted by on 5-26-20

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Savran

Posted by on Jul 25, 2020 in Odessa region, Shtetls | 2 comments

Kanetspol – XVIII, Sawrań (Polish), Саврань – Savran (Russian) Savran has been an urban-type village since 1957, a district center of the Odessa region. It has existed since the late XIV century. In the XVI – XVIII centuries, it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of the Balta uyezd, Podolia gubernia. Since 1926 Savran has been a center of a Jewish national village council. We visited Savran during our expedition in the summer 2018. In 2019, Vladimir Chaplin, a director at the Odessa Jewish Museum provided us with audio records and photos of the ethnographic expedition to Savran in 2012. An interview with unofficial head of the Jewish community of Savran Mikhail Usilnikov was especially valuable for us. He died in 2016. Get Directions Beginning I didn’t find information about Jewish community of Savran in the XVIII-early XIX century. In 1870, two synagogues were functioning in Savran. In 1889 there were three, in the early XX century – four. In 1912, there was a Jewish savings-and-credit society in Savran. In the XIX – early XX centuries, the main occupations of the Jewish population of Savran were crafts and trade. In 1914, Jews owned...

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Ladyzhinka

Posted by on Jul 11, 2020 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ладижинка (Ukrainian) Ladyzhinka is a village in Uman district, Cherkassy region. Since 1726 it was a part of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl in Uman uyezd, Kiev gubernia. Beginning Jews lived in Ladyzhinka from the XVIII century. In 1795, the Jewish community consisted of 400 people. Get Directions In the second half of the XIX century, the village grew into a town, and craftsmen began to settle there, particularly tailors, weavers and blacksmiths, who were mostly Jews. They lived in the center of the town, built houses and shops there and a few wealthy families were tenants. There were also three inns in Ladyzhinka and the owners were Jews. The population consisted of 1,470 Orthodox Christians, 12 Roman Catholics and 825 Jews. By the end of the XIX century, Jews accounted for 31,5% of the total population (1173 people). The town had two synagogues and a Jewish cemetery. During the pogroms in 1906, many Jews left Ladyzhinka. In the 1910s, a Jewish savings and loan society operated, Jews owned eight stores, two inns, a restaurant and a pharmacy. In 2017, one local citizen recalled rich Jewish woman Gesia who used to rent three ponds and...

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Golovanevsk

Posted by on May 28, 2020 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Golovanevsk is a district center of Kirovograd region. Population is  5 982 people (2016). In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Balta uyezd, Podolia gubernia. Jews lived in Golovanevsk starting in the late XVIII century. In the shtetl there were two synagogues in 1889, a private male training school in 1909, and a Jewish savings and credit society in 1912. Get Directions In 1905, a pogrom nearly happened in the shtetl. 15 Jews from Golovanevsk...

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Ushomir

Posted by on May 26, 2020 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Ushomir is a village in Korosten district, Zhytomir region. The village’s population is 1323 (as of 2019). Ushomir is located on the Uzh River, a tributary of the Pripyat. In the late XIX – early XX century, Ushomir was a shtetl in Zhitomir district, Volin guberniya. In 2017, local teacher Nikolay Palamarchuk was our guild in the village. He provided a detailed map of Jewish places of former shtetl which you can see below. Get Directions Beginning The first mention...

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Ananyev

Posted by on May 24, 2020 in Odessa region, Shtetls | 1 comment

אַנאַניעוו‎ (Yiddish), Ана́ньїв (Ukrainian), Ананьев (Russian) Ananyev is a city and the administrative center of Ananyiv district in the Odessa region. It stands on the Tyligul River. Population: 8,495 (2015 est.) Ananyev became part of the Russian Empire in 1792, registered as a district town (uyezd) of Kherson gubernia in 1834-1920, then assigned to the Odessa gubernia in 1920. In 1924-1940, Ananyev was part of the Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic within the Soviet Republic of Ukraine. David Vladimirovich...

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Krivoye Ozero

Posted by on Nov 2, 2019 in Mykolaiv region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Krivoye Ozero is an urban type village founded in the 18th century. It is located on the banks of the Kodyma River and holds a long history of both vibrant and tragic Jewish life. Since the 1970s, the village became the district center of the Nikolayev region, having previously belonged to the Odessa region. Between the 16th and 19th centuries, Chumaky Way, a trade road through which products from Southern Ukraine were delivered to the center, laid across Krivoye...

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Belilovka

Posted by on Aug 31, 2019 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 1 comment

Belilovka is a village in the Ruzhin district of the Zhitomir region. In the XVI through XVIII centuries, it was a village of Kiev county and voivodship, a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX and early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Berdichev uyezd, Kiev gubernia. The first records of Jews in Belilovka date back to 1719. Get Directions We learned that in April 1735 an attorney...

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