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Rzhyshchev

Posted by on 10-31-16

Kovshevatoe

Posted by on 10-31-16

Korsun

Posted by on 10-13-16

Novograd-Volynskiy

Posted by on 10-4-16

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Rzhyshchev

Posted by on Жов 31, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rzyszczów (Polish), Ржищев – Rzhishchev (Russian), Ржищів – Rzhyschiv (Ukrainian), אורזישטשב , אורזיטשוב (Yiddish) Rzhyshchev is a town in Kiev district of central Ukraine. The town’s estimated population is 7,519 (as of 2015). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Kiev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Rzhyshchev is 78 km south-east of Kiev. Beginning The Jewish population in Rzhyshchev may have existed at the time of Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795) before the Khmelnitsky uprising but confirmed accounts exist from much later times. Thus, in 1740, 40 Jews lived here. Later, when the Kyiv region became part of the Russian Empire in the 1790s, Rzhyshchev was included in the Pale of Settlement where Russian Jews were allowed to settle. In 1896 there was a Ravinskaya (Rabbi) street in Rzhyshchiv, where one could see the house which belonged to the great rabbi Mendel Avrum Yosakov. Also, four prayer schools named after the guilds which set them up, such as the rabbinical, the hatters’ school, the newly built school and the stone-built school. There was a new Jewish school (Zhuravskiy’s school) in Shyroka street. The Shoychet School was in Novobudovy St. 1 and the artisans’ school was in Kamyana St. Jewish population of Rzhyshchev: 1740 – 40 1897 – 6,513 (37%) 2016 – 0 In...

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Kovshevatoe

Posted by on Жов 31, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ківшовата – Kivshovata (Ukrainian), Ковшеватое – Kovshevatoe (Russian) Kovshevatoe is a historic village located in Kiev region of central Ukraine. The village’s estimated population is 2,400 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Tarasha Yezd of Kiev Gubernia.  Beginning The village was founded in the 1560s by a Polish noble called Chernysh. The first official written evidence dates from the 31st of May 1571 when King Sigismund Augustus confirmed the property rights for “the village Chernyshky called Kovshovatitse” to a boyar (Slav nobility)Tymofiy Tyshkovych from Bila Tserkva. It was a part of Rzeczpospolita (the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795) until the XVIII century when in 1793 it became a part of the Russian Empire. During the war of liberation headed by Bohdan Khmelnitskiy Kivshovate passed from one owner to another several times. We can assume that the Jewish community at that time was completely destroyed. Jewish population of Kovshevatoe: 1765 – 47 Jews 1788 – 117 Jews 1897 – 1265 ( 22%) 1926 – 311 Jews 1950’s ~ 20 Jews 2016 – 0 During the XVIII century the Jewish population of the village was growing steadily. According to the regular census of the Jewish population conducted to collect taxes more effectively, the following figures were recorded: 1765 – 47 Jews,...

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Korsun

Posted by on Жов 13, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Korsun’ (Russian), Korsuń Szewczenkowski (Polish), Korsun-Schewtschenkiwskyj (German), Korsun’-Shevchenkovskiy – Корсунь-Шевченковский (Russian), Корсунь-Шевченківський (Ukrainian) Korsun-Shevchenkovskiy (Korsun until 1944) is a town since 1938, a district center in Cherkassy region. It was founded by the Grand Prince of Kiev Yaroslav the Wise in 1032. In 1584, Korsun received the Magdeburg Charter. In the XVI-XVIII centuries it was a part of Kiev Voivodship in Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795). In 1793 Korsun became part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early...

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Novograd-Volynskiy

Posted by on Жов 4, 2016 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Novograd-Volynskiy, Novogradvolynsk, Novograd-Volynsk (Alternative Name), Zvihil, Zvil, Zvehil, זוויל ,זוועהיל, Zvhil (Yiddish), Новоград-Волинський (Ukrainian), נובוהרד-וולינסקי (Hebrew), Zwiahel (Polish), Новоград-Волынский   Novograd-Volynskiy is a historic city located in Zhytomir region, center of Novograd-Volynskiy district. Novograd-Volynskiy is located on the Sluch River, a tributary of the Goryn. The city’s estimated population is 56,155 (as of 2016). Before 1925 it was a сenter of Novograd-Volynskiy yezd, Volyn guberniya. City was mentioned first time in 1257 as Vozvyagel and was renamed to Novograd-Volynskiy after third...

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Smotrich

Posted by on Вер 18, 2016 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Smotrich is a historic town located in Dunaevtsy district of Khmelnitskiy region.  The town’s estimated population is 2,087 (as of 2001). During the time of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795), Smotrich was a town in Podolsk voivodeship (it received the Magdeburg Charter in 1488). Smotrich became a part of Russia Empire in 1795 , in XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Kamenets Yezd of Podolia Gubernia. Smotrich is approx. 32 km from Dunaevtsy and in 280...

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Germanovka

Posted by on Вер 1, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Germanovka is a village located in Obuhov district of Kiev. Germanovka is located on the Krasna River. The city’s estimated population is 1,667 (as of 2001). Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Vasilkov yezd, Kiev guberniya. Germanovka is approx. 62km south of Kiev. Beginning While it is thought that Germanovka’s first Jewish community was established in the 17th century and suffered under the Khmelnytskyi pogroms, there is no data available to confirm this. The Jewish community re-appeared in...

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Shtetls of Volyn gubernia

Posted by on Сер 10, 2016 in news | 0 comments

We first appeared here about 500 years ago… On the eve of the first world war around 400,000 of our ancestors lived in over 100 shtetls of Volyn Gubernia. Most of Volyn shtetls are on this map     Nowograd Wolynsk, Zviagel, Zwiahl, Zwiahel (Polish), Zvihil, Zvil, Zvehil, זוויל ,זוועהיל, Zvhil (Yiddish), Новоград-Вол 9378 Jews according to 1897 census (55% of total population) Ovruc, Ovrutch (Yiddish), Owrucz (Polish), Ovruch (Russian) 3445 Jews according to 1897 census (46% of total population)...

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