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Pokotilovo

Posted by on Гру 17, 2017 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Pokotilovo is a village in the Novoarkhangelsk district of the Kirovograd region in the Ukraine.  In the XIX and XX centuries, however, it was considered a shtetl in the Uman Uyezd, and part of Kiev province. Beginning According to historians, the first Jews settled in Pokotilovo in the XVIII century. By 1897, more than half of its residents were Jewish. Reports differ on the number of synagogues or prayer houses that existed during the XIX century.  Some say two; others report three.  The number appears to be dependent on what constituted a synagogue and how stable and prosperous the community was at any given time. One historian identified a rabbi by the name of Khaim (or perhaps Chaim) Goldstein (1845-?) in 1866.  Another identified  Matvey Leonovich Galperin as a state rabbi in the 1900’s. From the memories of  Michael...

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Vasilkov

Posted by on Гру 3, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Vasilkov is a city in Kiev region with a population, as of 2013, of 36,672. Vasilkov was incorporated into the Russian Empire in 1686 and belonged to the Kiev-Pechersk Monastery till 1785. In 1796, it became a center of the Vasilkov uyezd of Kiev gubernia. In 1648, Vasilkov was conquered by chmielnicki’s cossacks who massacred its inhabitants, Jews and Poles alike. Since Vasilkov was annexed to Russia in 1686 no Jewish community existed there until the second partition of Poland in 1792. Vasilkov was a Chasidic community and for some time David b. Nahum Twersky of Chernobyl lived there. The Jews in Vasilkov engaged in crafts, small-scale business, and worked in local tanneries. Jewish population of Vasilkov: 1799 – 1478 Jews 1802 – 1889 Jews 1861 – 2999 Jews 1897 – 5156 (40%) 1926 – 3061 (14%) 1939 – 1736 (11%)...

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Rotmistrovka

Posted by on Гру 3, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rachmastrivka, ראחמסטריווקא (Yiddish), Rotmistrzowka (Polish), Ротмистровка, Rotmistrovka (Russian) Rostmistrivka is a village in the Smiliansky district, Cherkassy region. Its population was 2,156 people in 2001. Before the revolution, Rotmistrovka was a shtetl of Cherkassy uyezd, Kiev guberniya. In 1905, it had two synagogues. A Jewish community appeared in Rotmistrivka in the XVII century. In 1863, the population of the town consisted of 1,946 Christians and 965 Jews. According to the census of 1897, 4,823 people lived in Rotmistrivka, including 1,785 Jews. In the second half of the XIX century, the spiritual leader of the community was Rabbi Yohanan Tversky, and Rotmistrivka was transformed into one of the centers of Hasidism. He was succeeded by his son Rabbi Mordechai. Rabbi Yohanan Tversky (1812, Chernobyl – 1895, Rotmistrivka) – the eighth son of Rabbi Mordechai of Chernobyl, the grandson of the...

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Kagarlik

Posted by on Лис 28, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Kagarlik has been a town since 1971, a district center of Kiev region. It’s history goes back to 1590. In the XVII – XVIII centuries Kagarlik was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Kagarlik was incorporated into the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX and early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Kiev uiezd, Kiev gubernia. Part of the information for this article was provided by Lubov Petrovna Tkachenko, who had been the head of the Kagarlik museum for 40 years. In the XIX – early XX centuries, most Jews of Kagarlik worked in crafts as well as the wholesale and retail trade. The town had market days and fairs where people could buy and sell cattle. Jews owned 83 industrial enterprises, shops, and bars. 15 factories out of 16 were owned by Jews. The Jews also...

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Rokitne

Posted by on Лис 26, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rokitne is an urban-type settlement located on the Ros River in Kiev region. It is the administrative center of Rokytnianskyi district. In 2001, population was 13,790. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was a shtetl Rakitne of Vasilkov uyezd, Kiev governorship. The town of Rokitne had already been known before 1518, owned at that time by Prince Ostrozkiit. In the XVII century, Rokitne was a remarkable settlement with a palace in it. In the mid of May 1648, Kazaks and Tatars captured Rakitnoye and destroyed the local Jewish community. In 1683, Rokitne belonged to landlord Gurskii. I couldn’t find any facts of the history of Jews in Rakitne from the pre-revolutionary period 🙁 In 1905, workers of Rakitne carried out a pogrom but it was put down by local peasants. In February 1919, peasants from Siniava attacked Rokitne. They...

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Veledniki

Posted by on Лис 25, 2017 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Novi Velidnyky (English), Wieledniki (Polish), Новые Веледники – Novye Veledniki (Russian) Veledniki is a village in the Ovruch district, Zhitomir region. The village’s estimated population is 783 (as of 2001). The settlement dates back to 1545. In the XVI-XVIII centuries it was in the Ovruch povet (district), Volyn voivodship of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was a shtetl Veledniki of Ovruch uyezd, Volyn governorship. Beginning First Jews settled in Novyye Veledniki in the XVII century. In the early XIX century, Veledniki was the center of Khasidism in the Volyn region. In the XIX-early XX centuries, small-scale crafts and trade were the main occupations of the Jewish population. Jewish population of Veledniki: 1897 – 659 (50%) 1924 – 427 Jews (24%) 2000’s – 0 In the late XIX century, there were...

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Malin

Posted by on Лис 19, 2017 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Malin is a historic city located in Zhytomyr region, center of Malin district. The city’s estimated population is 26,934  (as of 2013). In 1793, when Poland was divided for the second time, the town of Malin became part of Russia. Four years later, in 1797, government authorities formally incorporated Malin into the Radomishl district of Kiev Gubernia. Although the first mention of Jews in Malin was in 1784, many historians believe the community existed earlier. By the late XIX century, records show a synagogue, two Jewish prayer houses and a Jewish hospital there. In addition, we know that a Jew named Yakov Rabinovich and his brother Aron owned a furniture factory, dairy farms, and a dairy plant. At the turn of the century Nakhum Vaisblat (born in Narodichi in 1864) ,became a rabbi in Malin. Researchers have found references to his popularity, due...

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Mokra Kaligorka

Posted by on Лис 12, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Kalihórka Mokra (Polish), Мокрая Калигорка, Mokraya Kaligorka (Russian) Mokra Kaligorka is town of the Katerinopol district, Cherkassy region. It has been known since the early XVIII century, at which time it was incorporated into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. It has been a part of the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was the town Kaligorka Mokraya of Zvenigorod uyezd, Kiev gubernia. Most information for this article was provided by teacher of the local school Ludmila Diduk. We don’t know when Jews first appeared in Mokra Kaligorka. In 1896, a Jewish almshouse was functioning in Mokra Kaligorka. In 1914, Jews owned a drugstore, bakery, and 52 stalls including 13 factories and two grocery stores. There was also a landlord’s mansion, a Jewish synagogue, a bakery, the Jew Benia’s inn (he was mentioned in the book “Black Raven” by Vasyl Shkliar),...

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Moshny

Posted by on Лис 5, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Moshny is a village of Cherkassy district, Cherkassy region. Its population was 4,799 people in 2001. In the early ХХ century it was a shtetl of the Cherkassy uyezd, Kiev gubernia. Moshny is situated sixteen miles west-northwest of Cherkasy, a short distance north of the Vilshanka River, and about five miles southwest of the Dnieper River. Moshny was granted Magdeburg rights in 1592. The Moshny Jewish community was primarily a Hasidic community. Its population in the late eighteenth century was a mere one-hundred-thirty. There were several tragedies, not unique to a Ukrainian Jewish shtetl, that befell the Moshny Jews. A fire in 1881 destroyed sixty Jewish homes. In the early ХХ century, there were three synagogues and a Jewish cemetery in the village. We know where two of the synagogues were situated. Before the Revolution a Jew named Lakhman had organized production...

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Khotin

Posted by on Жов 22, 2017 in Chernivtsi region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Khotin is a district town in the Chernivtsi region, Ukraine. It was founded in the X century in Kievan Rus. Since the second part of the XIV century, it was part of the Moldavian principality. It was also under the power of Poland. Since 1711 it has been under the influence of Turkey. According to the Bucharest Peace Treaty of 1812 Khotin together with Bessarabia was incorporated into Russia. In 1918 it was annexed Romania. By 1940 the Soviet Union annexed the territories of Moldova including Khotin. By 1963 Khotin had been a district center of Chernivtsi region, USSR. Much more information about Jewish life in Khotin can be found in Khotin Yizkor book. Beginning A Jewish population first appeared in Khotin in the late XIV – early XV centuries. In the XV and XVI centuries, Jewish merchants passed through Khotin which was...

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Pereyaslav

Posted by on Вер 30, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Pereyaslav-Khmelnitskii (Pereyaslav by 1943) is a city of Kiev region, Ukraine. It was first mentioned in the chronicles in 906 and joined the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1569. It was incorporated into the Russian Empire in 1654. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was a centr of Pereyaslav Uezd of Poltava gubernia. Most information for this article was taken from the book of Tsilya Gehtman “Jews of Pereyaslav”. Beginning Jews have been living in Pereyaslav-Khmelnitskii since the XVII century. In 1620, the Polish King received complaints from his citizens about a large number of Jews in the town and their active participation in trade. Jews were prohibited to trade and own breweries, malt houses, and distilleries. In 1623, the town council and the local Jews entered into an agreement about giving the Jews equal rights with other citizens. During the...

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Makarov

Posted by on Лип 23, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Makarov is a city, district center of Kiev region. The city’s estimated population is 11.860 (as of 2006). It is known since the early 17th century. In the XVII-XVIII centuries it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX and early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Kiev uyezd (district) in Kiev gubernia. Beginning According to some historical sources, Jews in Makarov appeared in the second part of the XVIII century. A synagogue was built there and it became the residence of one of the first rabbis of Kiev region. In 1754, a fact of beating several Jews by the local police was recorded in documents. Jewish population of Makarov: 1765 – 217 Jews 1852 – 1150Jews 1897 – 3953 (74%) 1926 – 582 (14%) 1939 – 269 (8%)...

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Obukhov

Posted by on Лип 11, 2017 in Kiev region | 0 comments

Obuchów (Polish), Обухів – Obukhiv (Ukrainian), Обухов – Obukhov (Russian) Obukhov is a town in Kiev region. Its population is 33,322 people in 2016. Before the revolution, it was a shtetl in Kiev uyezd of Kiev Gubernia. I couldn’t find any serious data concerning the history of Obukhov Jews. The materials from articles of local historian was used for this article. It is not known when Jews first settled in Obukhov. In the late XIX – early XX century there was a whole Jewish block in the old part of Obukhov. Today it is known as “Center”. Here Jews owned 72  establishments. The Jews traded in nearby shtetls such as Germanovka, Tripolie, and Cherniakhov. The Jewish merchants of the second and first guild lived in Obukhov. They owned stalls and shops. In 1913, Obukhov was a center of Obukhov...

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Vinohrad

Posted by on Чер 21, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Vynohrad – Vinohrad – Виноград (Ukrainian), Vinograd (Polish), ווינאָגראַד – Winorod (Yiddish) Vinohrad is a village in Lisyanka district of Cherkassy region. The village’s estimated population is 1294 (as of 2001). Information concerning Holocaust in Vinograd was given by local History teacher O.Koshman. Most of this article was taken from book Childhood in a Shtetl by Abraham P. Gannes. Beginning The Jewish community existed in Vynohrad since the XVIII century. The village received Magdeburg rights 1850. Vinograd means “a town of vineyards” but grapes were not grown in the area. Abraham Mindich, estimated that “the town was about one-half mile wide and a mile long with all the stores and shops located in the middle of the town. There was also space next to the stores where farmers brought their fruits and vegetables every Monday to sell to the Jewish population...

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Yagotyn

Posted by on Чер 12, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Yagotin is a town in Kiev region, the center of Kiev district. It is situated on the river Supoy. According to the census of 2015, its population is 20,232 people. Before the revolution Yagotin was a shtetl of Piriatin uyezd, Poltava province. In 1957, the village Lisniaki was incorperated into Yagotin. In the pre-revolutionary period a considerable number of Jews were living in this village. In 1910, there were 34 Jewish families; which was 85% of the whole population. That is why the statistics on the actual size of the Jewish population throughout the history of Yagotin has been quite inaccurate. Some information for this article was taken from the interview of native of Yagotin Miron Manilov (1921-?) from centropa.org. Beginning Yahotyn was founded in 1552. At the end of XVII – beginning of the XIX century, Yahotyn, which...

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Medvin

Posted by on Тра 23, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Medvin is a town in Boguslav district of Kiev region. The town’s estimated population is 3,450 (as of 2007). It was founded in 1362. In 1569 it was incoporated into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and in 1620-1648, Medvin recieved Magdeburg Rights. In 1793 Medvin was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In XIX – early XX centuries it was a shtetl of Kaniv district, Kiev gubernia. Beginning Jews have been living in Medvin since the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In XIX – early XX centuries the main occupations of the Jewish population were crafts, petty trade, and rent. In the early XIX century Jews owned five stalls and three mills. In 1896 – 1901, Shimshon-Aron Polonskiy (1876-1948) was a rabbi in Medvin. In 1910, there were two synagogues and a Jewish cemetery in Medvin. In 1914, Jews owned a drugstore, three wood warehouses,...

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Katerinopol

Posted by on Тра 14, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Katerinopol (Kalniboloto by 1795) is an urban-type settlement (since 1965), a district center in Cherkassy region, Ukraine. It was first written about in the mid XVI century when it acquired Magdeburg right. In the XVI-XVIII centuries, it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire as a district town of Kiev province. Since 1798 it was a shtetl Yekaterinopol, Zvenigorodka uyezd, Kiev province. In the 1930’s, it was a center of the village council. Beginning The Jews of Katerinopol are first mentioned in documents from 1720. During the XVII and XVIII centuries, Jews were repeatedly victims of pogroms. The Polish census of 1764 included 19 Jews from Katerinopol kahal. It means that the Jewish community was destroyed during Haydamaks’ uprisings in right-bank Ukraine in the 1760’s. Jewish population of Katerinopol: 1797...

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Orynin

Posted by on Тра 10, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Orynin is a town of Kamenets-Podolskiy district. The town’s estimated population is 2664. Orynin was first written about in 1474. Since 1569 it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth In 1672-1699, it was under the power of the Ottoman Empire. Since 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. Since 1797 Orynin was a town of Kamenets-Podolskiy uyezd, Podolia gubernia. Information for this article was taken from a book written by Beril Segal and Naum Bernstein. The head of Kamienets-Podolskiy community Aleksandr Shulyk originated from Orynin and Orynin historian Vladimir shared their memories. Beginning Orynin is first mentioned in archival documents dating back from 1474. A Jewish community in Orynin dates back to 1582. During the times of Khmelnitskiy uprising the shtetl was ruined, many Jews and Frankists left it, a lot of them were killed. All the books from...

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Sokolets

Posted by on Кві 15, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Sokolets is a small village in Dunayivtsi district, Khmelnitskiy region. In 2001, 676 people lived in the village. In the era of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Sokolets had been a shtetl of Podolia voivodship (district) by 1793. In the early XX century, it was a shtetl of Podolia district, Ushitsa uezd. An abandoned part of the village is located in the bottom of the picturesque Ushitsa gorge. Beginning Jews started to settle in Sokolets in the XVIII century. After the murder of local Jews during the Haidamak uprising (1768), the Jewish population of Sokolets dropped significantly. Jewish population of Sokolets: 1765 – 356 Jews 1847 – 457 Jews 1897 – 747 (27% of total) 1926 – 616 Jews 1931 – 425 Jews In 1765, there were 356 Jews in Sokolets and nearby villages. In XVIII century Polish landowners Zakrevskiy, Pototskiy,...

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Korostyshev

Posted by on Кві 9, 2017 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Korosteszow (Polish), Korostysiv, Коростишів (Ukrainian), Коростышев – Korostyshev (Russian) Korostyshev, is a town and district center in Zhitomir region. It was founded in 1471 and was included into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Since 1569 it was a town in Zhitomir county, Kiev voivodeship (province) in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl in Radomysl district, Kiev province. Beginning Jews have been living in Korostyshev since XVI century. In 1602, a synagogue was functioning there. Jewish population of Korostyshev: 1765 – 316 Jews 1847 – 2657 Jews 1897 – 4160 (53% of total) 1926 – 3017 (37%) 1939 – 2170 (19%) 1989 – 215 1995 – 70 In 1772, the kahal paid 1,240 zloty of poll tax. The kahal was the third largest in...

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Ivankov

Posted by on Бер 18, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ivankov is a city in Kiev region, center of Ivankov district. The city’s estimated population is 10,678 (as of 2012). Ivankov is located on the Teterev River, a tributary of the Dnieper. In XIX – beginning of XX century it was the shtetl of Radomyshl Uezd, Kiev Gubernia. Ivankov is approx. 80 km from Kiev and in 50 km from Chernobyl. Most data was taken from the publication of the head of Ivankov Jewish community Nelli Grigorovich “Born in shtetl”. In it, she organised various sources into a single narrative, interviewed dozens of people and collected hundreds of photos. Beginning A settlement has existed on the site of Ivankiv since ancient times. Originally named Trudynov, it became Pasynkovschina in 1524 and has been known as Ivaniv since 1589 (later Ivankiv) after the owner of the territory, Ivan Proskura. Jewish population of...

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Obraztsovaya

Posted by on Лют 27, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Obraztsovaya was a former Jewish Agricultural colony. It was located in territory which is now a part of Fastov, Kiev region, Ukraine. Information for this article was collected with the help of Fastov local historian Vladimir Dorosenko. It was founded in 1854 as a Jewish agricultural colony in Vasilkov district, Kiev province. In 1854, 15 Jewish families (263 people) lived in Obraztsovaya, in 1898 – seven Jewish families (35 people). The colony was built at the expense of Abraham Markovich Brodskiy. Every family was given 15.5 desiatine (appr.42.6 acres) of free state land. In 1875, there were 75 Jewish men in Obraztsovaya. The absence of experienced agriculturalists and lack of equipment and cattle made most of colonists lease their land. In 1898 – 1899, three families engaged in agriculture, two of them had horses. In 1900, the society of...

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Tarashcha

Posted by on Лют 27, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 2 comments

Tarashcha is a city located in Kiev region, center of Tarashcha district. The city’s estimated population is 13,307 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was the center of Tarashcha Yezd (county) of Kiev Gubernia. Holocaust information was provided by local historial Leonid Lashenko. Much more information can be found in Yiddish book “Tarashcha, a History of a Small Shtetl in Kiev Guberniya”.  It was published in USA, 1930’s. Beginning A Jewish community has existed in Tarashcha since the mid-XVIII century. In 1722, Tarashcha received a status of a shtetl. In 1765, 134 Jews lived in Tarashcha. According to the lustration of 1789, the Jews owned 31 houses in the market and 41 houses in the side streets. City plan, 1826 City plan, 1913 By the early XIX century, more than 5,300 Jews lived in...

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Kadlubitsa

Posted by on Лют 19, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Kadlubitsa is a former Jewish colony, now it is a part of Fastov, Kiev region. Before Revolution it was a Jewish agricultural colony in Vasilkov district, Kiev province. Since 1925, it’s been Kadlubitsa Jewish National village council of Fastov district, Belaya-Tserkov region. Information for this article was collected with the help of Fastov local historian Vladimir Dorosenko. Beginning Kadlubitsa was founded in 1850 as an agricultural colony by Jews from Fastov. According to a local legend, the name ‘Kadlubitsa’ comes from the word ‘kadosh’ (Hebrew – sacred). There were 29 households, 434 residents (207 men and 227 women) in 1900. Their main occupation was grain production. Some local Jews were engaged in trade and reselling goods, visiting fairs at nearby villages and towns. Jewish population of Kadlubitsa: 1859 – 430 Jews 1896 – 826 Jews 1906 – 510 Jews 1931...

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Chervonianskaya

Posted by on Лют 14, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Chervonianskaya was a Jewish colony located nine kilometers from Fastov, in Kiev region. Now it was a village called Krasnoye, Fastov district. Before the Revolution it was a Jewish agricultural colony in Vasilkov uezd of Kiev gubernia. It was founded in 1851 on state land. In 1898, there were 44 Jewish families, 312 people. The residents had 378 dessiatines (1,040 acres) of land. The colony was destroyed during Denikin’s pogrom in 1919 but it was reestablished at the expense of AgroJoint (US funded) organization in the 1920’s. Several typical houses based on a American project were built here. During my visit in 2016 only one of those houses was preserved in its original appearance. I haven’t found any information about the Jews of Chervonianskaya colony after the 1920’s. In 2016, the locals didn’t even know that their village used to...

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Zvenigorodka

Posted by on Лют 14, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Zvenigorodka is a city and district center in Cherkassy region. The city’s estimated population is 17,400 (as of 2016). It was first mentioned in the historical record in 1545. According to another version, it existed during the Kievan Rus period. In 1569 Zvenigorodka was in Kiev district, Kiev province in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. It was incorporated into the Russian Empire in 1793. In the XIX-early XX centuries Zvenigorodka was a district town of Kiev gubernia. Beginning In 1765, there is mention of a single Jewish tenant living in Zvenyhorodka among 134 homes in the village. In the late XVIII century almost all the inns, mills, and distilleries of Zvenigorodka were rented by the Jews. The names of the tenants are present in Polish documents from 1792: Mendel Shmuylovich, Chaim Mortkovich, Moshko Genikhovich, Yankel and Leyzor Peysakhovich, Abram Mortkovich, Moshko Leybovich,...

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Buky

Posted by on Лют 8, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Buky is a small town in Mankovka district, Cherkassy region. The town’s estimated population is 2,134 (2007). Since 1793 it’s been a part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Uman district, Kiev province. Beginning The first mention of Buky in historical record was in 1554. In the early 18th century a synagogue was built in Buky and two more ones in the late XIX. In the 1740’s, count Kiselev sold his Buky-Antonovka estate to duke Liubomirskiy who had attached nearby village Antonovka to Buky. At that time there were 496 households in both settlements. 3,133 people lived there including 260 Jewish households which contained 1,558 people. Jewish population of Buky: 1847 – 1182 Jews 1897 – 2298 (59%) 1923 – 281 Jews 1939 – 546 Jews 1950’s ~ 100 2016...

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Liantskorun

Posted by on Січ 29, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Zarichanka (Liantskorun by 1947), is a village in Chemerovtsy district of the Khmelnitskiy region. The village is located on the river Zhvanchik and the tributary Letavka. In 1793 it was incoperated into the Russian Empire. By the late XIX – early XX century it was a shtetl in Kamenets district of Podolye province. In 1923-1928 it was a district center. According to the census of 2001 its population was 892 people. In 2000 a local resident Ruslan Kozak (born in 1979) tried to write down the history of Liantskorun while he was studying in Kamenets-Podolskiy University. A lot of facts about the life of Jews from Zarechanka were mentioned in his work. Beginning The name Liantskorun appeared in the first half of the XVIII century when the family Liantskoronskiy owned the village and managed to elevate it to the status of a...

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Stepantsy

Posted by on Січ 26, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Stepantsy is a village located in Kaniv district of Cherkassy region. The villag’s estimated population is 2,770 (as of 2007). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was village of Kaniv uezd of Kiev gubernia. Beginning The first mention of Jews in Stepantsy dates back to 1765, when 12 people lived here. In 1845, Stepantsy was bought by Rogozinskiy for his daughter Antonina. She was married to Liudvik Klementyevich Khamets. By 1863, the local population consisted of 2,370 Christians and 3,171 Jews. In 1882, Jews were expelled from the village by the authorities.  Jews could come back to the shtetl only after Kiev trader Iona Zaytsev had rented the land from the local Polish landlord Khamets in 1903. The letter is invitation to wedding in Zolotonosha which was send to Burshtein , Stepantsy from 6 September 1891 (photo...

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Lysianka

Posted by on Січ 25, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Lysianka is district center in Cherkassy region, Ukraine. The city’s estimated population is 8,161 (as of 2001). In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl in Zvenigorodka district of Kiev province. Beginning Jews appeared in Lysianka in XVII century. In 1702, The Haydamaky rebels killed almost all the Jews in Lysianka. The Jewish population of Lysianka suffered a lot in 1768 during the period “Koliyivshchyna”. Burials in the Jewish cemetery which date back to 1761 prove the existence of Jews in Lysianka in the XVIII century. By 1867 there were three synagogues in Lysianka and in the 1890s there was a Jewish almshouse. In the 1890s Mordko Teplichnyy was a rabbi, in 1895 Mordko Weitburd was rabbi’s assistant. In 1907 Moyshe Weiserman was the rabbi in Lysianka and in 1914 his role was filled by Meyer-Aron Berkvich Pribysh....

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Tagancha

Posted by on Січ 24, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Tagancha is a village in Ukraine in Kanev district, Cherkassy region. The settlement’s estimated population is 1,413 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Kanev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Beginning Tagancha first appears on the map of the territory adjusted to Kiev in the early XV century. We can assume that Jews appeared in Tagancha at the beginning of the XVI century but there isn’t any documentary evidence. During Bohdan Khmelnitskiy’s uprising (1648-1654) neighboring Kanev was the center of Kanev regiment. The Jewish community was supposedly destroyed by Cossacks during this time. In 1750, the Haydamaky detachment led Aleksey Liakh killed one Jewish trader who served the Polish gentry. This is the first mention in historical record of the Tagancha Jewish community. In 1678, Tagancha became the property of great Polish...

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Shtetls of Chernigov gubernia

Posted by on Січ 14, 2017 in news | 0 comments

Below is the map of settlements which has more that 1000 of Jewish population according to 1897 census in Chernigov Gubernia. In 1897, there lived 114.452 Jews. Part of Chernigov gubernia was moved to Russia in 1920’s and became a part of Bryansk region. These shtetls wouldn’t be described in this website due to lack of information and difficult political situation. Chernigov 8799 Jews according to 1897 census (32% of total population) Berezne 1357 Jews according to 1897 census (14% of total population) Borzna 1516 Jews according to 1897 census (12% of total population) Glukhov 3853 Jews according to 1897 census (26% of total population) Gorodnya 1249 Jews according to 1897 census (29% of total population) Kozelets 1634 Jews according to 1897 census (32% of total population) Konotop 4426 Jews according to 1897 census (24% of total population) Krolevets 1815...

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Zhvanets

Posted by on Січ 14, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Zhvanets is a town in Kamenets district of Khmelnitskiy region. The town’s estimated population is 1,529 (as of 2001). It is situated on the iver Dniester 20 kilometers away from the district center. It has been a town of Kamenets district since the mid 1920s. Before Revolution it was a shtetl of Kamenets ueazd, Podolia gubernia. Beginning The first mention of  Zhvanets that appeared in historical record was in 1431. In 1646 the town received  Magdeburg right. It is known that there was a conflict between the Jews and bishop Chizhevskiy in 1663. Jewish population of Zhvanets: 1765 – 1134 Jews 1784 – 617 Jews 1847 – 1619 Jews 1897 – 3353 (67% of total) 1902 – 3494 Jews 1923 – 1196 Jews 1926 – 1383 (40,2%) 1939 – 626 Jews 1989 – 5 Jews 1993 – 0 In...

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Khorol

Posted by on Січ 14, 2017 in Poltava region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Khorol is a town in Poltava region, the centre of Khorol district. Its population is 14,643 according to the 2001 census. In the early XX century it was a center of Khorol uyezd (district), Poltava province. Beginning Jews probably first settled in Khorol at the beginning of the XVII century but in 1648 during the Chmelnitsky uprising the local Jewish community was apparently annihilated. Jews settled in Khorol againl in the early XIX century. According to archival data, in 1800, 44 Jewish peasants lived in the town. The revision in 1847 showed that there was a “Khorol Jewish Society” containing 78 people in the region. Jewish population of Khorol: 1897 – 2,056 (25% of total) 1926 – 2,089 (19,7%), 1939 – 701 (6.4%) 2016 ~ 10 Jews According to the 1897 census, more than 173,000 residents lived in the region....

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Olshana

Posted by on Січ 5, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Olshana is a town in Gorodishche district, Cherkassy region. The town’s estimated population is 3,256 (as of 2011). It was established around 1598 and has been a part of the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX  – early XX centuries,  it was a shtetl in the Zvenigorodka district, Kiev gubernia. Beginning In 1847, the Jewish community consisted of 689 people, and in 1897 – 1233 (20%). In 1867, a synagogue was functioning in Olshana. Eliezer-Leyb Shapiro (1858-?) was the rabbi in Olshana since 1892. Jewish population of Olshana: 1847 – 689 Jews 1861 – 850 (22%) 1897 – 1233 (20%) 1923 – 916 Jews 1939 – 195 Jews 1993 – 1 Jews 2016 – 0 Crafts and trade were the main occupations of the Jewish population in the 19th – early 20th centuries. In 1914, Jews owned a drugstore and forty-five stalls...

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Boyarka

Posted by on Січ 5, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Boyarka is a town located in Lisyanka district of Cherkassy region of central Ukraine. Boyarka is located on the Gniliy Tikich River, a tributary of the South Bug. The town’s estimated population is 654 (as of 2009). Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Zvenigorodka yezd, Kiev guberniya. Boyarka is approx. 32 km from Korsun and in 160 km from Kiev. Beginning The first evidence of the Jewish community of Boyarka, dating back to the early XVII century, was found in the Kiev Regional Archive. In 1625, three Jewish families were mentioned in the tax records of Boyarka town. According to the census of 1765, 13 Jewish families were resident in Boyarka. In 1768, as a result of the Haydamaks’ uprising, the number of Jews was down to seven families. Others must have moved to safer locations. The...

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Horodyshche

Posted by on Гру 14, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Gorodische – Городище (Russian), Gorodish, Horodishtch (Yiddish), Horodische – Городище (Ukrainian), Horodyshche, Horodysce, Gorodisce, Gorodyszcze (Alternative Name) Horodyshche is a historic town located in Cherkassy region, center of Horodyshche district. Horodyshche is located on the Vilshanka River, a tributary of the Dnieper. The city’s estimated population is 14,480 (as of 2011). Before Revolution, Horodyshche was a shtetl of Cherkassy County, Kiev Gubernia. Beginning There is no exact information when Jews first settled around the area of modern Horodyshche. However, they must have already lived there during the popular uprising of the Ukrainian peasants when Haydamaks murdered a lot of Polish gentry and Jews. The proportion of Jews among the population of our region increased significantly in the XIX century. More can be found in the archived documents and pre-1917 census and reports. In 1900, there were three synagogues and one...

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Rosava

Posted by on Гру 12, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Россава (Russian), Росава (Ukrainian) Rosava is a village in Mironovskiy district, Kiev region. In the 16th – 18th centuries, it was a part of Rechpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795). In 1793 Rosava became part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, the shtetl Rosava was in Kanev district, Kiev region.  There are seven documents concerning Jews of Rosava on Wikimedia.org, supplied by an unknown user. It was a main source of information for this article. Beginning We don’t know when Jews appear in Rosava… A synagogue in Rosava was opened in 1815 and existed till its closing in 1864. In 1864, there were about 59 Jewish houses in Rosava. 400 Jews lived in them. In 1866, the synagogue where the followers of tsaddik Duvidl Tverskoy used to pray was closed. There wasn’t any synagogue in the town so...

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Rzhyshchev

Posted by on Жов 31, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rzyszczów (Polish), Ржищев – Rzhishchev (Russian), Ржищів – Rzhyschiv (Ukrainian), אורזישטשב , אורזיטשוב (Yiddish) Rzhyshchev is a town in Kiev district of central Ukraine. The town’s estimated population is 7,519 (as of 2015). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Kiev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Rzhyshchev is 78 km south-east of Kiev. Beginning The Jewish population in Rzhyshchev may have existed at the time of Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795) before the Khmelnitsky uprising but confirmed accounts exist from much later times. Thus, in 1740, 40 Jews lived here. Later, when the Kyiv region became part of the Russian Empire in the 1790s, Rzhyshchev was included in the Pale of Settlement where Russian Jews were allowed to settle. In 1896 there was a Ravinskaya (Rabbi) street in Rzhyshchiv, where one could see the house which belonged to...

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Kovshevatoe

Posted by on Жов 31, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ківшовата – Kivshovata (Ukrainian), Ковшеватое – Kovshevatoe (Russian) Kovshevatoe is a historic village located in Kiev region of central Ukraine. The village’s estimated population is 2,400 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Tarasha Yezd of Kiev Gubernia.  Beginning The village was founded in the 1560s by a Polish noble called Chernysh. The first official written evidence dates from the 31st of May 1571 when King Sigismund Augustus confirmed the property rights for “the village Chernyshky called Kovshovatitse” to a boyar (Slav nobility)Tymofiy Tyshkovych from Bila Tserkva. It was a part of Rzeczpospolita (the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795) until the XVIII century when in 1793 it became a part of the Russian Empire. During the war of liberation headed by Bohdan Khmelnitskiy Kivshovate passed from one owner to another several times. We can...

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Korsun

Posted by on Жов 13, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Korsun’ (Russian), Korsuń Szewczenkowski (Polish), Korsun-Schewtschenkiwskyj (German), Korsun’-Shevchenkovskiy – Корсунь-Шевченковский (Russian), Корсунь-Шевченківський (Ukrainian) Korsun-Shevchenkovskiy (Korsun until 1944) is a town since 1938, a district center in Cherkassy region. It was founded by the Grand Prince of Kiev Yaroslav the Wise in 1032. In 1584, Korsun received the Magdeburg Charter. In the XVI-XVIII centuries it was a part of Kiev Voivodship in Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795). In 1793 Korsun became part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX century Korsun was a shtetl in the Kanev Yesd, Kiev province. There were two more towns with large Jewish communities in the Korsun area – Shenderovka and Steblev If you would like to help Korsun Jewish community or Jewish museum please contact Klavdiya Kolesnikova kik-korsun@rambler.ru Beginning The Jews would settle in Korsun in the beginning of the XVII century....

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Novograd-Volynskiy

Posted by on Жов 4, 2016 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Novograd-Volynskiy, Novogradvolynsk, Novograd-Volynsk (Alternative Name), Zvihil, Zvil, Zvehil, זוויל ,זוועהיל, Zvhil (Yiddish), Новоград-Волинський (Ukrainian), נובוהרד-וולינסקי (Hebrew), Zwiahel (Polish), Новоград-Волынский   Novograd-Volynskiy is a historic city located in Zhytomir region, center of Novograd-Volynskiy district. Novograd-Volynskiy is located on the Sluch River, a tributary of the Goryn. The city’s estimated population is 56,155 (as of 2016). Before 1925 it was a сenter of Novograd-Volynskiy yezd, Volyn guberniya. City was mentioned first time in 1257 as Vozvyagel and was renamed to Novograd-Volynskiy after third Poland partition in 1795. Before 1795, city was named Zvyagel.   All information for this article was provided by local historian Leonid Kogan (koganzvil@yandex.com) who research Novograd-Volinskiy Jewish history for more than 20 years. Leonid translated into Russian memorial book “Zvil” (Novograd-Volynsk) which was published in Yiddish and in Hebrew in Israel, in 1962. You can download book here. Beginning First Jews...

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Germanovka

Posted by on Вер 1, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Germanovka is a village located in Obuhov district of Kiev. Germanovka is located on the Krasna River. The city’s estimated population is 1,667 (as of 2001). Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Vasilkov yezd, Kiev guberniya. Germanovka is approx. 62km south of Kiev. Beginning While it is thought that Germanovka’s first Jewish community was established in the 17th century and suffered under the Khmelnytskyi pogroms, there is no data available to confirm this. The Jewish community re-appeared in the middle of the XIX century when Germanovka became an important trading centre. A synagogue was built in 1849. In pinkos dating back to 1848, a pogrom of 1881 is recorded. In 1864, the Jewish community of Germanovka numbered 442. In 1891, this number grew to 895. In 1897, the total population of Germanovka was 3,628, and there were 1,049...

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Shtetls of Volyn gubernia

Posted by on Сер 10, 2016 in news | 0 comments

We first appeared here about 500 years ago… On the eve of the first world war around 400,000 of our ancestors lived in over 100 shtetls of Volyn Gubernia. Most of Volyn shtetls are on this map     Nowograd Wolynsk, Zviagel, Zwiahl, Zwiahel (Polish), Zvihil, Zvil, Zvehil, זוויל ,זוועהיל, Zvhil (Yiddish), Новоград-Вол 9378 Jews according to 1897 census (55% of total population) Ovruc, Ovrutch (Yiddish), Owrucz (Polish), Ovruch (Russian) 3445 Jews according to 1897 census (46% of total population) ‎ Ostra, Ostraha, Ostre, Ostrog (Yiddish), Ostróg (Polish), Острог – Ostroh (Ukrainian) 9208 Jews according to 1897 census (62% of total population) Rovne (Yiddish), Równe (Polish),Ровно – Rovno (Russian) 13780 Jews according to 1897 census (56% of total population) ‎ Starokonstantinov 9212 Jews according to 1897 census (56% of total population) Новые Веледники – Novye Veledniki (Russian) 569 Jews according...

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Fastov

Posted by on Сер 7, 2016 in Kiev region | 0 comments

Фастов (Russian), Хвастів – Khvastiv (Formerly), כוואסטוב ,חוואסטוב (Yiddish) Fastov is a historic city located in Kiev region, center of Fastov district. Fastov is located on the Unava River, a tributary of the Irpen. The city’s estimated population is 47,284 (as of 2016). Fastov became a part of Russia Empire in 1793, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Vasylkov Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Fastov is approx. 40 km from Belaya Tserkov and in 73 km from Kiev. Beginning While the first Jewish community was officially established in 1750, the first Jewish settlement in Fastiv can be traced back to the 17th century. The middle of the XVIII century was marked with devastating pogroms for the Fastov jewish community that suffered greatly from Haidamaks, paramilitary Cossack bands. 1768 was the hardest year for the Jews living in the town. Jewish population of Fastov:...

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