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Voznesensk

Posted by on Sep 12, 2020 in Mykolaiv region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Вознесенск(Russian), Вознесенськ(Ukrainian) Voznesensk is a city and a district center Nikolayev region. The city’s estimated population is 35.843 (as of 2015). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Elisavetgrad Yezd of Kherson Gubernia. Get Directions When the foundation stone was laid on May 10, 1795, the population was composed of a mix of Ukrainians, Russians, and Moldovans. From the late XVIII century when Poland was partitioned and merged with the Russian Empire, Jews began to arrive, quickly contributing to the growth of the town. From the nineteenth until the early twentieth century, it was a shtetl in Yelizavetgrad uyezd, Kherson gubernia. From 1828 until late in the twentieth century, the town held the status of a military settlement, thus limiting the number of Jewish residents. Nevertheless, according to a 1897 census, by the late...

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Liubashevka

Posted by on Sep 6, 2020 in Kiev region, Odessa region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Любашівка(Ukrainian), Любашевка(Russian) Liubashevka is an urban-type settlement, a district centre in the Odessa region of Ukraine. In the 19th to early-20th centuries, it was a village in the Ananyev Uyezd of the Kherson gubernia. Unfortunately, I didn’t find much information about Jews of Liubashevka. In 2018, we visited former shtetl during our summer’s expedition and didn’t find Jews here. Most information for this article was provided by local teacher Valeriy Bondarenko (see video below). Get Directions Unfortunately, I didn’t find much information about Jew of Liubashevka before WWII. The town was founded in the late 18th century. Since 1895, the rabbi was Shmuel-Zeev Shekhter (1875–?). In 1914, the only drugs store in town belonged to a Jew. Many armies passed through town in the period from 1917 to 1920. In 1919 there was a pogrom, arranged by the Volunteer Army units; some...

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Cherniakhov

Posted by on Aug 30, 2020 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Черняхов(Russian), Черняхів(Ukrainian) Cherniakhov is a small town, a district center of the Cherniakhov district, Zhitomir region. In the early XX century it was a shtetl of Radomyshl uyezd (district), Kiev province. Most information about the post-war Jewish life of Cherniakhov was provided by the unofficial head of the Jewish community in Cherniakhov Raisa Makovoz during our visit in the summer of 2017. Idl Ayzman’s (1922, Cherniakhov – 2017, Petah Tikva) fascinating diaries (here and here) shed light on the Jews of Cherniakhov in the 1920s – 1930s. Virtually no information could be found on the Jewish life of Cherniakhov in the XIX – early XX centuries. Get Directions Beginning The Cherniakhov settlement was first mentioned in 1545. According to the 1897 state census, the Cherniakhov Jewish community included 1,774 members. It was just under a half of the whole population of the...

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Berezovka

Posted by on Aug 22, 2020 in Odessa region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Beresowka (Yiddish),  Березівка – Berezivka (Ukrainian), Березовка – Berëzovka (Russian) Berezovka is a city and administrative center of the Berezovka Raion in Odessa region. In 2016, the population is estimated to be 13,421. During our visit in the summer 2018, we could get almost no information about Jews from Berezovka. There wasn’t a Jewish community in the town at that moment. Jews didn’t live there anymore. Get Directions On April 26–27, 1881, the Jews were attacked in a pogrom, and, out of the 161 buildings owned by Jews, only the synagogue and pharmacy were undamaged. Description of 1905 pogrom: «The population of Berezivka was extremely anxious at the rumor of the total extermination of Jews. One of the scruffles between the tradeswomen at the market turned into a fight. The crowd immediately rushed to the Jewish stalls, destroying everything...

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Khaschevatoye

Posted by on Aug 16, 2020 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Хащувате(Ukrainina), Хащеватое(Russian) Khaschevatoye is a village in Gayvoron district, Kirovograd region. Its population is 2,260 people. The village is on the Southern Bug River. It used to be a town of Gaysin uyezd, Podolia gubernia from the late 18th through the early 20th century. From 1923 through 1932, Khaschevatoye was a district center of the Odessa region. Information about Jews from Khaschevatoye was obtained from several different sources, including books by Solgutovsky and Khaim Melamud, and from various websites as well. In the summer of 2018, we explored Khaschevatoye’s points of Jewish interest, with the guidance of Yelena Mikhaylovna Vdovichenko, the principal of a local school. More information about the Holocaust in Khaschevatoye can be found in khashchevato1942.ru Get Directions Beginning The settlement’s history goes back to 1362. It was originally a part of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and was...

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Savran

Posted by on Jul 25, 2020 in Odessa region, Shtetls | 6 comments

Kanetspol – XVIII, Sawrań (Polish), Саврань – Savran (Russian) Savran has been an urban-type village since 1957, a district center of the Odessa region. It has existed since the late XIV century. In the XVI – XVIII centuries, it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of the Balta uyezd, Podolia gubernia. Since 1926 Savran has been a center of a Jewish national village council. We visited Savran during our expedition in the summer 2018. In 2019, Vladimir Chaplin, a director at the Odessa Jewish Museum provided us with audio records and photos of the ethnographic expedition to Savran in 2012. An interview with unofficial head of the Jewish community of Savran Mikhail Usilnikov was especially valuable for us....

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Ladyzhinka

Posted by on Jul 11, 2020 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ладижинка (Ukrainian) Ladyzhinka is a village in Uman district, Cherkassy region. Since 1726 it was a part of the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl in Uman uyezd, Kiev gubernia. Beginning Jews lived in Ladyzhinka from the XVIII century. In 1795, the Jewish community consisted of 400 people. Get Directions In the second half of the XIX century, the village grew into a town, and craftsmen began to settle there, particularly tailors, weavers and blacksmiths, who were mostly Jews. They lived in the center of the town, built houses and shops there and a few wealthy families were tenants. There were also three inns in Ladyzhinka and the owners were Jews. The population consisted of 1,470 Orthodox Christians, 12 Roman Catholics and...

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Golovanevsk

Posted by on May 28, 2020 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Golovanevsk is a district center of Kirovograd region. Population is  5 982 people (2016). In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Balta uyezd, Podolia gubernia. Jews lived in Golovanevsk starting in the late XVIII century. In the shtetl there were two synagogues in 1889, a private male training school in 1909, and a Jewish savings and credit society in 1912. Get Directions In 1905, a pogrom nearly happened in the shtetl. 15 Jews from Golovanevsk were fiercely beaten at the fair in the neighboring village of Troyany (now Zaporozhye region – editor’s note), a Jewish market was looted. After that event there was great anxiety among Jews of the shtetl. The non-Jews who came from Troyany after the fair to the village were beaten severely. A man was sent to Balta in order to buy...

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Ushomir

Posted by on May 26, 2020 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Ushomir is a village in Korosten district, Zhytomir region. The village’s population is 1323 (as of 2019). Ushomir is located on the Uzh River, a tributary of the Pripyat. In the late XIX – early XX century, Ushomir was a shtetl in Zhitomir district, Volin guberniya. In 2017, local teacher Nikolay Palamarchuk was our guild in the village. He provided a detailed map of Jewish places of former shtetl which you can see below. Get Directions Beginning The first mention of Jewish families in Ushomir date back to the XVII century. For 20 years (between 1870 and 1890) there were breweries, two leather factories, three tar factories, and glass factories functioning in Ushomir. A brick factory and a pottery shop had been expanded. Almost all enterprises employed Jews – from masters to workers. Some of the industrial enterprises also belonged...

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Ananyev

Posted by on May 24, 2020 in Odessa region, Shtetls | 1 comment

אַנאַניעוו‎ (Yiddish), Ана́ньїв (Ukrainian), Ананьев (Russian) Ananyev is a city and the administrative center of Ananyiv district in the Odessa region. It stands on the Tyligul River. Population: 8,495 (2015 est.) Ananyev became part of the Russian Empire in 1792, registered as a district town (uyezd) of Kherson gubernia in 1834-1920, then assigned to the Odessa gubernia in 1920. In 1924-1940, Ananyev was part of the Moldavian Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic within the Soviet Republic of Ukraine. David Vladimirovich Neifleisch (born in 1948), a deputy of the local town council and one of the last remaining Jewish residents of Ananyev shared his memories of the post-war Ananyev in the summer of 2018. His father’s first family, a wife and two children (a boy and a girl) perished in Ananyev during the Nazi occupation. Neifleish could remember the photo of...

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Domanevka

Posted by on Feb 25, 2020 in Mykolaiv region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Domanevka is an urban-type village, a district centre in the Nikolayev region. It was established in the early XIX century. In the XIX to early-XX centuries, it was a shtetl in the Ananyev Uyezd district of the Kherson gubernia. When we visited Domanevka in the summer of 2018, we were unable to collect any meaningful information about local Jews. There were no Jews in the town, and local Ukrainians could tell us very little. We were shown only the remains of a New Jewish cemetery on the “Jewish mountain”. It was so overgrown by the forest that it would have been impossible to find without help. However, in the winter 2019, I came across a novel by Valery Varzatsky, in which he described Jews of post-war Domanievka in detail. Much of this article is based on information gathered from...

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Krivoye Ozero

Posted by on Nov 2, 2019 in Mykolaiv region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Krivoye Ozero is an urban type village founded in the 18th century. It is located on the banks of the Kodyma River and holds a long history of both vibrant and tragic Jewish life. Since the 1970s, the village became the district center of the Nikolayev region, having previously belonged to the Odessa region. Between the 16th and 19th centuries, Chumaky Way, a trade road through which products from Southern Ukraine were delivered to the center, laid across Krivoye Ozero, including during the time of the Russian Empire. In the late 19th to early 20th centuries, the village became part of the Balta Uyezd (Podolia Gubernia). Get Directions Beginning Jewish life in Krivoye Ozero came about parallel to the founding of the village in 1762. Almost a century later, there were three functioning synagogues. In 1896, five years after...

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Belilovka

Posted by on Aug 31, 2019 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 1 comment

Belilovka is a village in the Ruzhin district of the Zhitomir region. In the XVI through XVIII centuries, it was a village of Kiev county and voivodship, a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX and early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Berdichev uyezd, Kiev gubernia. The first records of Jews in Belilovka date back to 1719. Get Directions We learned that in April 1735 an attorney of Duke Liubomirsky, the owner of Belilovka, complained about several dozens of cossacks having attacked the village. They robbed, beat, and humiliated people of the shtetl, particularly Jews. Three Jewish citizens were tortured to death. In 1863, there were two synagogues in Belilovka. Shloyme Makhrinsky (1880 – ?) was a rabbi in Belilovka starting in 1900. In 1912, a savings...

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Piatigory

Posted by on May 2, 2019 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Пятигоры (Russian), П’ятигори (Ukrainian) Piatigory is a village in the Tetiyev district of Kiev region. In the XVI – XVIII centuries, it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Starting in 1793 it was in the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Tarascha uyezd, in the Kiev gubernia. Get Directions In 1787, there were ten traders among the Jews. In 1873, a synagogue was functioning in Piatigory. In 1865 – 1910, Moyshe Lerman (? – 1910) was a rabbi in Piatigory. When M.Lerman had died his son Tsvi-Itskhok (1866 – ?) took his place and was a rabbi in the shtetl starting in 1910. In 1914, two synagogues were opened in Piatigory. There was a Jewish cemetery in the shtetl. Jewish population of Piatigory: 1847 – 603 Jews 1897 – 1385...

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Goloskovo

Posted by on May 2, 2019 in Mykolaiv region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Goloskovo is a village in Kryve Ozero district, Nikolaev region. In the XIX– early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Balta uyezd, Podolia gubernia. Nowadays Goloskovo has completely merged with the neighboring village of Oniskove wiith one common village council. However, ini 1917 they had been two separate villages inhabited by people of different nationalities, the Jewish shtetl of Goloskovo and the Ukrainian village of Oniskove. Get Directions Information about Jews of Goloskovo was collected during our ethnographic expedition in the summer 2018. More information can be provided by local former teacher of history Valentina Volodimirivna Granovska +38(096)544-91-77 . You can download her book about Jewish history of Goloskovo (in Ukrainian). In 1863 there was a synagogue in Goloskovo and in 1889 there were two synagogues there. In 1909, after Yakov-Elia Shapiro’s death, his son Khaim Shapiro (1867-?)...

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Novaya Odessa

Posted by on May 1, 2019 in Mykolaiv region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Novaya Odessa is a district center of Nikolayev region. It was founded in 1776. In the XIX – early XX centuries, known as a shtetl of Novaya Odessa (Fedorovka), Kherson uyezd and gubernia. During our ethnographic expedition in the summer of 2018 very little information was found on the Jewish history of Novaya Odessa. Jews settled in Novaya Odessa in the late XIX century. In 1897 1,010 Jews lived in the town, where they comprised 18.3 percent of the total population. Get Directions In 1868, there was a working synagogue in Novaya Odessa. In 1910, two synagogues were registered in the shtetl. Jewish population of Novaya Odessa: 1897 – 1010 (18%), 1910 – 4205 (42%) 1923 – 389 Jews 1939 – 228 Jews 1990х ~ 45 Jews 2018 ~ 10 Jews In the 1890s, Lev Kagan was appointed a...

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Smela

Posted by on Apr 8, 2019 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Smela (Yiddish), Smela – Смeла (Russian) Smela is a city in the Cherkassy region. It is situated on the left bank of the Tiasmin river. The population of Smela was 69,000 people in 2005. The first settlement on the Tiasmin river dates back to 1542 and was called Yatskovo, later it was called Tiasmino. The shtetl of Smela was founded in 1633 with the support of magnate Stanislav Kontsepolskiy. In 1650, Smela Jewish community was first mentioned. In 1773, at the request of then-owners of the town the Liubomirskys, the Polish king gave the town the Magdeburg Right. In 1795, Smela became a part of the Russian Empire. It was a shtetl of Cherkassy uezd, Kiev gubernia. Get Directions In the XVIII century, Smila was often subject to pogroms by Haidamaks, especially in 1768, when Zheleznyak entered the city...

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Khoroshev

Posted by on Apr 1, 2019 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Khoroshev is an urban-type village, a district center in the Zhitomir region. Khoroshev has been a part of the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX – early XX centuries it was a shtetl in Zhitomir uyezd, Volyn gubernia. The settlement has been renamed several times: by 1607 – Alexandropol, in 1607-1912 – Goroshki, in 1912-1923 – Kutuzovo, in 1923 – 1933 – Volodarsk-Volynskiy, and in 2016 – Khoroshev. We gathered information about post-war Jews of Khoroshev during our summer expedition in 2017. Get Directions The first mention of Khoroshev dates back to 1545. Jews have been living in Khoroshev since the XVIII century. Their main occupations were crafts and petty trade. In 1912, a Jewish service and credit society was established in Khoroshev. In early September 1919, the 44th Soviet Division retreated through Khoroshev. For three days and...

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Puliny

Posted by on Mar 31, 2019 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Puliny (from 1935 until 2016 called Chervonoarmiisk) is an urban-type settlement in Zhytomyr Oblast. It is the administrative center of Puliny Raion. Population: 5,454(2013 est.) In XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Zhitomir Yezd, Volyn Gubernia. In the mid-nineteenth century, Puliny did not form an independent Jewish community and in 1867 there were only 43 Jewish houses. Get Directions In 1867 the Russian authorities knew about one prayer house in Puliny, which was officially registered in 1854. Most probably, the prayer house was built around 1850. It was also mentioned in the Polish geographical dictionary in 1870. In the early XX century, however, Puliny developed into a settlement with 200 wooden houses. Two rows of wooden stalls stood in the middle of the Market Square. According to Jewish folklore, the Rebbe of Makarov blessed...

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Kamenka

Posted by on Mar 30, 2019 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Kamenka is a town in the Cherkassy region with the population of 11,978 (2016). Before the 1917 revolution, Kamenka was a shtetl of Chigirin uyezd, Kiev guberniya. No much information was available about Kamenka’s Jewish history in the XIX – early XX century. In the early XX century, there was one synagogue and a prayer house in the town. During pogroms, the synagogue and the Jewish amateur theatre were destroyed. In 1919, it has about six thousand inhabitants; about 540 Jewish families. The pogrom was perpetrated by the Grigorievists in the middle of May, approximately May 14-20. There were 76 Jews killed (62 men and 14 women). In the early 1920s, a Jewish self-defense unit, 25 people strong, was formed Photod of the Jewish family in Kamenka was provided by  rabbi Meinard Bell from US to Judaica Institute, Kiev: Children of...

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Emilchino

Posted by on Mar 29, 2019 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

A village named Emilchino has been known since the year 1585; however, little information exists about pre-revolutionary life there. We do know that the town was originally incorporated into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. However, in 1793, Emilchino became part of the Russian Empire. We find some references to a Jewish population in the town during the XIX – XX centuries. Most Jewish residents worked in petty trading or in various crafts. During that time frame, the town became an integral part of Novograd-Volynskiy uyezd, Volyn gubernia. The town locates 40 minutes from Novograd-Volynskiy, only 154 kilometers from the regional center of Zhitomir. Today, the population of Emilchino has grown in size since its days as a small shtetl and is a sizable Ukrainian village with no remnants of its Jewish past. Get Directions The basic information for this article was...

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Gostomel

Posted by on Mar 28, 2019 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Hostoml (Polish), Гостомель – Hostomel, Hostomel’ (Ukrainian) Gostomel is a town in the Kiev region. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of the Kiev uyezd, Kiev gubernia. Very little is known about Jewish history of this former shtetl. Some information on the post-war Jewish population of Gostomel was provided by Genia Mezhiritskaya, born in 1938. We met in Gostomel in spring 2018. Get Directions Following the second partition of Poland in 1793, when the Russian Empire acquired vast swathes of Central Europe of what is now Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova and Lithuania and the pale of settlement was drawn, prohibiting Jews from settling anywhere in Russia outside of a restricted area, Kiev, even though geographically within the pale, was excluded from the list permitted settlements; Jews were not allowed to live there. They would settle...

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Ovruch

Posted by on Mar 26, 2019 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Ovruch is a city in Zhytomyr region. In the XVI – XVIII centuries, it was a part of the Commonwealth of Poland. In the year 1793 the town was incorporated into the Russian Empire. Since 1795 it has been a district (uyezd) center of the Volyn gubernia. The first mentioning of Jews living in Ovruch dates back to 1629. At that time Jews there owned three houses and paid taxes to the owner of Ovruch. The main occupations of the Jews in Ovruch back then were crafts (currying of sheepskin, shoemaking, tailoring) and trade. By 1765, Jews living in Ovruch owned 80 houses. By the XVIII century, there was a significant Jewish community there that was a branch of Chernobyl community. Get Directions In the late XVIII century, the majority of the Jews living in Ovruch were Hasidic. A.D.-B....

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Alexandrovka

Posted by on Mar 21, 2019 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Alexandrovka is a city located in Kirovograd region of central Ukraine, center of Alexandrovka district. Kozelets is located on the Tyasmin River, a tributary of the Dnieper. The city’s estimated population is 8721 (as of 2017). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Chigirin Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Information about the Jews of Alexandrovka was collected and organized by the head of the local museum Vasyl Viktorovich Biloshapka. Get Directions The first written mention of the Jews of Alexandrovka district dates back to the second half of the XVIII century, beginning from 1765. It was found in some Polish documents. Rabbi Nakhman from Bratslav (1772 – 1810), the future founder of Bratslav (Breslovsky) Hasidism used to live in the village called Stara Osota of Alexandrovka district after his marriage at the age of 13. He...

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Novoarkhangelsk

Posted by on Jan 24, 2019 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Novoarkhangelsk is an urban-type settlement since 1957 and a district center of Kirovograd region. It was established in 1742. In the XIX to early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Yelizavetgradka uyezd, Kherson guberniya. Novoarkhangelsk stands on river Sinuha. On the opposite side of river locates former shtetl Torgovitsya. We were in Novoarkhangelsk in the summer 2017, but we couldn’t gather any information about the history of Jews living in this former shtetl. Get Directions Jews have been living in Novoarkhangelsk since 1764. In the XVIII century, the main occupations of the Jewish population of the shtetl were crafts and trade. Jewish population of Rizhanovka: 1897 — 943 (15%) 1923 – 570 Jews 1939 – 209 Jews In the 1880’s Jews owned the majority of trade and industrial enterprises including mills and smithies. In 1913, Jews owned the only...

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Rizhanovka

Posted by on Jan 13, 2019 in Cherkasy region | 0 comments

Ryzhanovka is a village in the Zvenigorodka district of the Cherkassy region. In the XIX and early XX centuries it was a shtetl of Zvenigorodka district of the Kiev guberniya. A native of Ryzhanovka Dmitriy Morgulis collected information about the Jews of the shtetl all his life. However, he died in 2013-2014 and without publishing it. A lot of information used in this article was given by Judith Merida and Rabbi Elazar Nezdatny. The latter’s grandfather was born in Ryzhanovka. Get Directions Jews had been living in Ryzhanovka since XVII century. Their main occupations were crafts, selling salt, horses, cattle, and rental properties. In the early 19thcentury two synagogues opened in Ryzhanovka. One of them was presented to the community by Yona Mendelson in 1827. Jewish population of Rizhanovka: 1800 — 2668 Jews 1897 — 1374 (33%) 1906 — 1196 (29%)...

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Zlatopol

Posted by on Jun 13, 2018 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Zlatopol is a settlement in the former Kiev guberniya. In 1959, Zlatopol was incorporated into Novomirgorod in the Kirovograd region. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl belonging to the Chigirin uyezd, Kiev guberniya. In the late XVIII century, Jews began to settle in Zlatopol. By 1787, the town belonged to the noble Polish Liubomirskiy family. Ksaveriy Liubomirsky stimulated the development of Zlatopol. He used to hold fairs there, and gave credit to Jewish merchants. In the late XVIII – early XIX centuries Hasidish tzaddik Arie-Leib from Shpola (Shpoler Zeide) lived in Zlatopol. Get Directions In 1800, Rebbe Nakhman from Bratslav settled there. However, in 1802, the tsaddik’s wife died of consumption. He buried her in the Zlatopol Jewish cemetery and moved away. 2 more lists In the mid-XIX century, a lot of Jewish merchants...

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Shpola

Posted by on May 14, 2018 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Shpola – Шпола (Ukrainian), Shpole, שפּאָלע (Yiddish) Shpola is a town in Cherkassy region, a center of Shpola district, a geographical center of Ukraine. 18,112 lived in the town in 2011. Before the Revolution, Shpola was a town of Zvenigorod Uezd of Kiev gubernia. I could find very little information about the history of Shpola Jewish community before 1917 🙁 Get Directions The heyday of the Jewish shtetl and its emergence as a Hasidic center in the 18th century were connected with the tzadik Shpoler Zeide (“the grandfather from Shpola”). Rabbi Yehudah Aryeh Leib ben Boruch (Saba from Shpola), also known as (1725, Uman – 1812, Shpola) – (‘grandfather’-a nickname given to him by the Baal Shem Tov at his circumcision), is famed as a miracle worker and devoted to the succour of poor Jews in distress. In his...

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Torgovitsa

Posted by on Apr 24, 2018 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Torgovitsa is a village of Novoarkhangelsk district, Kirovograd region. Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Uman uyezd, Kiev province. I could find very little information about Jews from Torgovitsa 🙁 We visited Torgovitsa in 2017 and made few photos of Holocaust mass grave and remains of Jewish cemetery. Get Directions According to 1897 census, 1299 Jews lived there (35% of total population). Before the revolution Jews lived mainly in Novaya street which was up to the Market square. There were no pre-revolutionary buildings in the village. Volko Solomonovich Golberg was a teacher in the village before the war. He had daughter Betia and son Yosef. Shmil (unknown surname) was a worker in the collective farm. All Jews of Torgovitsa were exterminated during the Holocaust… Incription on the fence Monument on the grave When the Jews were driven to the...

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Luginy

Posted by on Apr 21, 2018 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Luhin (Yiddish), Лугины – Luginy (Russian) Luginy, an urban-type settlement (since 1967)is a district center in the Zhytomyr region. In the XVII-XVIII centuries it was governed by the Kiev voivodeship as part of the Commonwealth, and since 1793 by the the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries it was in the township of Luginy Ovruch uyezd, Volyn Gubernia. Get Directions Jewish population of Luginy: 1847 – 1154 Jews 1897 – 1599 (64%) 1923 – 1709 Jews 1939 – 857 (37%) 1989 – 20 Jews 2017 – 2 Jews In the early XVII century, there was a Jewish community in Luginy. In 1648, Jews escaped from Luginy, rescuing themselves from attacks by Cossack detachments of B. M. Khmelnitsky. In 1721, the Jewish community was reborn. In 1867, there were two synagogues in Luginy. Basic occupations of the Jewish population...

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Slovechno

Posted by on Apr 11, 2018 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Словечне – Slovechne (Ukrainian), Словечно – Slovechno (Russian) Slovechno is a village in Ovruch district, Zhitomir region. The population is 1,725 people (in 2001). In the early XX century, Slovechno was a shtetl of Ovruch uyezd, Volin gubernia. The village was a district center of the Zhitomir region from 1923 till 1962. Part of the information for this article was provided by local historian Oleksiy Gorbachevskiy. Much more of information about Jews of Slovechno can be found in the book Slovechno is My Shtetl by Isaak Kipnis. But it is in Yiddish 🙁 In 2017, local historian Oleksiy Gorbachevskiy provide for us good excursion in Slovechno. You will be able to see him on all videos in this article. Get Directions There isn’t much information about the pre-revolutionary history of Jews in Slovechno. In 1913, Jews owned all 19...

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Olevsk

Posted by on Apr 8, 2018 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 2 comments

Olevsk is a city in Zhytomyr region. It is the administrative center of Olevsk district. In 2001, population was 10,896. In the XVI – XVIII centuries it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Olevsk has been incorporated into the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX – early XX century it was a shtetl of Ovruch uyezd, Volyn gubernia. Olevsk has been known since 1488. In 1641, it received the Magdeburg right. Much more information about Holocaust and PreWWII Olevsk can be found in the book by L.Znakovskaya. Beginning Jews in Olevsk were mentioned for the first time in 1704, as leaseholders of the town. In the second half of the eighteenth century there were between 21 and 32 Jewish houses in Olevsk; by the mid-nineteenth century (1867) the number of Jewish houses reached 106. Get Directions In...

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Shtetls of Kherson gubernia

Posted by on Mar 27, 2018 in news | 3 comments

  All places with significant Jewish population in former Kherson gubernia on one map according to 1897 census. On the eve of World War I, more than 340 000 Jews lived in this area.     Get Directions Kherson 17492 Jews according to 1897 census (30% of total population) Берислав – Berislav (Russian) 2641 Jews according to 1897 census (22% of total population) Nikolaev 19555 Jews according to 1897 census (21% of total population) Александрия – Alexandriia (Russian) 3735 Jews according to 1897 census (27% of total population) Novogeorgievsk was a city in Ukraine that since 1961 was flooded by the Kremenchuk water reservoir. 1454 Jews according to 1897 census (13% of total population) 70% of Novogeorgievsk is a village Nagirne now. Ананьев – Ananev, Anan’ev, Ananyev (Russian) 3527 Jews according to 1897 census (21% of total population) Elisavetgrad...

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Norinsk

Posted by on Jan 6, 2018 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Norinsk is a village in the Ovruch district, Zhitomir region (Ukraine), first recorded in 1545. In the XVI-XVIII centuries, it was a shtetl in the Ovruch district of the Volyn voivodship in the Commonwealth of Lithuania. In 1793, it became part of the Russian Empire and until early XX century, it remained a shtetl of Ovruch uezd in the Volyn gubernia. According to the 2001 census, its population is 1,360 people. Some information in this article was provided by Aleksandr Efman. He was born in Norinsk before the war and has been living in Ovruch since 1955. In 1847, 566 Jews lived in Norinsk, in 1897, this number went up to 584 (34.7%), in 1923, to 329. Jews have been living in Norinsk since the XVIII century. The Jews of Norinsk were mainly engaged in different crafts, retail trade,...

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Horodnytsa

Posted by on Jan 6, 2018 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Horodnytsa is a town in Novograd-Volynskyi district of the Zhitomir region. Its population was 5,470 in 2011. Before the revolution of 1917, Horodnytsa was a small town in the Novograd-Volynskiy uyezd of the Volin gubernia. Horodnytsa is situated on the River Sluch, 42 km northwest of Novohrad-Volynskyi and 121 km northwest of Zhytomyr. The small town initially belonged to the Korecki family and from 1651 – to Princes Chartoryski. In 1810 it passed to Princes Lubomirski, and in 1856 – to Waclaw Rulikowski. We don’t know for sure when the Jews first arrived in Horodnytsa. We can only assume that it was sometime in the XVII century. Get Directions In the XIX century, the history of Horodnytsa was connected to the local faience and porcelain factory, which was established by Prince Jozef Chartoryski in Korets in 1799 but moved to...

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Korosten

Posted by on Jan 1, 2018 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Искорость – Iskorost’ (Russian), Коростень – Korosten’ (Ukrainian) Korosten (Iskorosten – by 1923) is a town, a district center in Zhitomir region. Since the XIV century it has been incorporated into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Since 1569 it has been a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Since 1793 – a part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries it was a shtetl of Ovruch uyezd, Volyn gubernia. Beginning Jews in Korosten were first mentioned in 965. Get Directions In the mid-XVII century, Cossack squads of Bogdan Khmelnitskiy almost completely destroyed Jewish population of Korosten. A Jewish community was reborn in the XVIII century. In 1865, there were two synagogues in Korosten. In the XIX century, the construction of the Warsaw – Kiev – St Petersburg railroad line contributed to the demographic and economic growth of the...

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Medvedovka

Posted by on Dec 20, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Medvedovka (Yiddish Transliteration), Медведовка, Medvedovka (Russian) Medvedovka is a village in Chigirin district, Cherkassy region. In the XVI-XVII centuries it was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, in the early XVII century it got Magdeburg Rights, and from 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX-early XX centuries it was a shtetl of Chigirin Uyezd, Kiev Gubernia.   In 1790 an 18-year-old rabbi, Rebbe Nachman and his family, settled in Medvedevka  surrounded by numerous Hassidim. In 1798, he decided to visit Eretz HaKodesh,The Holy Land for the holidays of Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur. Having sold all his belongings he gathered money for the road and on the 18th of Iyar, on Lag ba-Omer, he left Medvedevka together with one of his students.  The Rabbi’s family waited for him in the village until he returned in...

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Pokotilovo

Posted by on Dec 17, 2017 in Kirovohrad region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Pokotilovo is a village in the Novoarkhangelsk district of the Kirovograd region in the Ukraine.  In the XIX and XX centuries, however, it was considered a shtetl in the Uman Uyezd, and part of Kiev province. Beginning According to historians, the first Jews settled in Pokotilovo in the XVIII century. By 1897, more than half of its residents were Jewish. Reports differ on the number of synagogues or prayer houses that existed during the XIX century.  Some say two; others report three.  The number appears to be dependent on what constituted a synagogue and how stable and prosperous the community was at any given time. Get Directions One historian identified a rabbi by the name of Khaim (or perhaps Chaim) Goldstein (1845-?) in 1866.  Another identified  Matvey Leonovich Galperin as a state rabbi in the 1900’s. From the memories...

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Vasilkov

Posted by on Dec 3, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 2 comments

Vasilkov is a city in Kiev region with a population, as of 2013, of 36,672. Vasilkov was incorporated into the Russian Empire in 1686 and belonged to the Kiev-Pechersk Monastery till 1785. In 1796, it became a center of the Vasilkov uyezd of Kiev gubernia. In 1648, Vasilkov was conquered by chmielnicki’s cossacks who massacred its inhabitants, Jews and Poles alike. Since Vasilkov was annexed to Russia in 1686 no Jewish community existed there until the second partition of Poland in 1792. Get Directions Vasilkov was a Chasidic community and for some time David b. Nahum Twersky of Chernobyl lived there. The Jews in Vasilkov engaged in crafts, small-scale business, and worked in local tanneries. Jewish population of Vasilkov: 1799 – 1478 Jews 1802 – 1889 Jews 1861 – 2999 Jews 1897 – 5156 (40%) 1926 – 3061 (14%) 1939 –...

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Rotmistrovka

Posted by on Dec 3, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rachmastrivka, ראחמסטריווקא (Yiddish), Rotmistrzowka (Polish), Ротмистровка, Rotmistrovka (Russian) Rostmistrivka is a village in the Smiliansky district, Cherkassy region. Its population was 2,156 people in 2001. Before the revolution, Rotmistrovka was a shtetl of Cherkassy uyezd, Kiev guberniya. In 1905, it had two synagogues. Get Directions A Jewish community appeared in Rotmistrivka in the XVII century. In 1863, the population of the town consisted of 1,946 Christians and 965 Jews. According to the census of 1897, 4,823 people lived in Rotmistrivka, including 1,785 Jews. In the second half of the XIX century, the spiritual leader of the community was Rabbi Yohanan Tversky, and Rotmistrivka was transformed into one of the centers of Hasidism. He was succeeded by his son Rabbi Mordechai. Rabbi Yohanan Tversky (1812, Chernobyl – 1895, Rotmistrivka) – the eighth son of Rabbi Mordechai of Chernobyl, the grandson...

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Kagarlik

Posted by on Nov 28, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Kagarlik has been a town since 1971, a district center of Kiev region. It’s history goes back to 1590. In the XVII – XVIII centuries Kagarlik was a part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Kagarlik was incorporated into the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX and early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Kiev uiezd, Kiev gubernia. Part of the information for this article was provided by Lubov Petrovna Tkachenko, who had been the head of the Kagarlik museum for 40 years. Get Directions In the XIX – early XX centuries, most Jews of Kagarlik worked in crafts as well as the wholesale and retail trade. The town had market days and fairs where people could buy and sell cattle. Jews owned 83 industrial enterprises, shops, and bars. 15 factories out of 16 were owned by Jews. The...

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Rokitne

Posted by on Nov 26, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rokitne is an urban-type settlement located on the Ros River in Kiev region. It is the administrative center of Rokytnianskyi district. In 2001, population was 13,790. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was a shtetl Rakitne of Vasilkov uyezd, Kiev governorship. The town of Rokitne had already been known before 1518, owned at that time by Prince Ostrozkiit. In the XVII century, Rokitne was a remarkable settlement with a palace in it. In the mid of May 1648, Kazaks and Tatars captured Rakitnoye and destroyed the local Jewish community. In 1683, Rokitne belonged to landlord Gurskii. I couldn’t find any facts of the history of Jews in Rakitne from the pre-revolutionary period 🙁 In 1905, workers of Rakitne carried out a pogrom but it was put down by local peasants. In February 1919, peasants from Siniava attacked Rokitne. They...

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Veledniki

Posted by on Nov 25, 2017 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Novi Velidnyky (English), Wieledniki (Polish), Новые Веледники – Novye Veledniki (Russian) Veledniki is a village in the Ovruch district, Zhitomir region. The village’s estimated population is 783 (as of 2001). The settlement dates back to 1545. In the XVI-XVIII centuries it was in the Ovruch povet (district), Volyn voivodship of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was a shtetl Veledniki of Ovruch uyezd, Volyn governorship. Beginning First Jews settled in Novyye Veledniki in the XVII century. Get Directions In the early XIX century, Veledniki was the center of Khasidism in the Volyn region. In the XIX-early XX centuries, small-scale crafts and trade were the main occupations of the Jewish population. Jewish population of Veledniki: 1897 – 659 (50%) 1924 – 427 Jews (24%) 1970’s – 1 Jew 2000’s – 0...

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Malin

Posted by on Nov 19, 2017 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 4 comments

Malin is a historic city located in Zhytomyr region, center of Malin district. The city’s estimated population is 26,934 (as of 2013). In 1793, when Poland was divided for the second time, the town of Malin became part of Russia. Four years later, in 1797, government authorities formally incorporated Malin into the Radomishl district of Kiev Gubernia. Get Directions Although the first mention of Jews in Malin was in 1784, many historians believe the community existed earlier. By the late XIX century, records show a synagogue, two Jewish prayer houses and a Jewish hospital there. In addition, we know that a Jew named Yakov Rabinovich and his brother Aron owned a furniture factory, dairy farms, and a dairy plant. At the turn of the century, Nakhum Vaisblat (born in Narodichi in 1864), became a rabbi in Malin. Researchers have found references to his...

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Mokra Kaligorka

Posted by on Nov 12, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 1 comment

Kalihórka Mokra (Polish), Мокрая Калигорка, Mokraya Kaligorka (Russian) Mokra Kaligorka is town of the Katerinopol district, Cherkassy region. It has been known since the early XVIII century, at which time it was incorporated into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. It has been a part of the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX-early XX centuries, it was the town Kaligorka Mokraya of Zvenigorod uyezd, Kiev gubernia. Most information for this article was provided by teacher of the local school Ludmila Diduk. Get Directions We don’t know when Jews first appeared in Mokra Kaligorka. In 1896, a Jewish almshouse was functioning in Mokra Kaligorka. In 1914, Jews owned a drugstore, bakery, and 52 stalls including 13 factories and two grocery stores. There was also a landlord’s mansion, a Jewish synagogue, a bakery, the Jew Benia’s inn (he was mentioned in the book “Black Raven” by...

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