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Sokolets

Posted by on Кві 15, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Sokolets is a small village in Dunayivtsi district, Khmelnitskiy region. In 2001, 676 people lived in the village. In the era of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth Sokolets had been a shtetl of Podolia voivodship (district) by 1793. In the early XX century, it was a shtetl of Podolia district, Ushitsa uezd. An abandoned part of the village is located in the bottom of the picturesque Ushitsa gorge. Beginning Jews started to settle in Sokolets in the XVIII century. After the murder of local Jews during the Haidamak uprising (1768), the Jewish population of Sokolets dropped significantly. Jewish population of Sokolets: 1765 – 356 Jews 1847 – 457 Jews 1897 – 747 (27% of total) 1926 – 616 Jews 1931 – 425 Jews In 1765, there were 356 Jews in Sokolets and nearby villages. In XVIII century Polish landowners Zakrevskiy, Pototskiy,...

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Korostyshev

Posted by on Кві 9, 2017 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Korosteszow (Polish), Korostysiv, Коростишів (Ukrainian), Коростышев – Korostyshev (Russian) Korostyshev, is a town and district center in Zhitomir region. It was founded in 1471 and was included into the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Since 1569 it was a town in Zhitomir county, Kiev voivodeship (province) in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793 it was incorporated into the Russian Empire. In XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl in Radomysl district, Kiev province. Beginning Jews have been living in Korostyshev since XVI century. In 1602, a synagogue was functioning there. Jewish population of Korostyshev: 1765 – 316 Jews 1847 – 2657 Jews 1897 – 4160 (53% of total) 1926 – 3017 (37%) 1939 – 2170 (19%) 1989 – 215 1995 – 70 In 1772, the kahal paid 1,240 zloty of poll tax. The kahal was the third largest in...

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Ivankov

Posted by on Бер 18, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ivankov is a city in Kiev region, center of Ivankov district. The city’s estimated population is 10,678 (as of 2012). Ivankov is located on the Teterev River, a tributary of the Dnieper. In XIX – beginning of XX century it was the shtetl of Radomyshl Uezd, Kiev Gubernia. Ivankov is approx. 80 km from Kiev and in 50 km from Chernobyl. Most data was taken from the publication of the head of Ivankov Jewish community Nelli Grigorovich “Born in shtetl”. In it, she organised various sources into a single narrative, interviewed dozens of people and collected hundreds of photos. Beginning A settlement has existed on the site of Ivankiv since ancient times. Originally named Trudynov, it became Pasynkovschina in 1524 and has been known as Ivaniv since 1589 (later Ivankiv) after the owner of the territory, Ivan Proskura. Jewish population of...

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Obraztsovaya

Posted by on Лют 27, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Obraztsovaya was a former Jewish Agricultural colony. It was located in territory which is now a part of Fastov, Kiev region, Ukraine. Information for this article was collected with the help of Fastov local historian Vladimir Dorosenko. It was founded in 1854 as a Jewish agricultural colony in Vasilkov district, Kiev province. In 1854, 15 Jewish families (263 people) lived in Obraztsovaya, in 1898 – seven Jewish families (35 people). The colony was built at the expense of Abraham Markovich Brodskiy. Every family was given 15.5 desiatine (appr.42.6 acres) of free state land. In 1875, there were 75 Jewish men in Obraztsovaya. The absence of experienced agriculturalists and lack of equipment and cattle made most of colonists lease their land. In 1898 – 1899, three families engaged in agriculture, two of them had horses. In 1900, the society of...

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Tarashcha

Posted by on Лют 27, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Tarashcha is a city located in Kiev region, center of Tarashcha district. The city’s estimated population is 13,307 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was the center of Tarashcha Yezd (county) of Kiev Gubernia. Holocaust information was provided by local historial Leonid Lashenko. Much more information can be found in Yiddish book “Tarashcha, a History of a Small Shtetl in Kiev Guberniya”.  It was published in USA, 1930’s. Beginning A Jewish community has existed in Tarashcha since the mid-XVIII century. In 1722, Tarashcha received a status of a shtetl. In 1765, 134 Jews lived in Tarashcha. According to the lustration of 1789, the Jews owned 31 houses in the market and 41 houses in the side streets. City plan, 1826 City plan, 1913 By the early XIX century, more than 5,300 Jews lived in...

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Kadlubitsa

Posted by on Лют 19, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Kadlubitsa is a former Jewish colony, now it is a part of Fastov, Kiev region. Before Revolution it was a Jewish agricultural colony in Vasilkov district, Kiev province. Since 1925, it’s been Kadlubitsa Jewish National village council of Fastov district, Belaya-Tserkov region. Information for this article was collected with the help of Fastov local historian Vladimir Dorosenko. Beginning Kadlubitsa was founded in 1850 as an agricultural colony by Jews from Fastov. According to a local legend, the name ‘Kadlubitsa’ comes from the word ‘kadosh’ (Hebrew – sacred). There were 29 households, 434 residents (207 men and 227 women) in 1900. Their main occupation was grain production. Some local Jews were engaged in trade and reselling goods, visiting fairs at nearby villages and towns. Jewish population of Kadlubitsa: 1859 – 430 Jews 1896 – 826 Jews 1906 – 510 Jews 1931...

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Chervonianskaya

Posted by on Лют 14, 2017 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Chervonianskaya was a Jewish colony located nine kilometers from Fastov, in Kiev region. Now it was a village called Krasnoye, Fastov district. Before the Revolution it was a Jewish agricultural colony in Vasilkov uezd of Kiev gubernia. It was founded in 1851 on state land. In 1898, there were 44 Jewish families, 312 people. The residents had 378 dessiatines (1,040 acres) of land. The colony was destroyed during Denikin’s pogrom in 1919 but it was reestablished at the expense of AgroJoint (US funded) organization in the 1920’s. Several typical houses based on a American project were built here. During my visit in 2016 only one of those houses was preserved in its original appearance. I haven’t found any information about the Jews of Chervonianskaya colony after the 1920’s. In 2016, the locals didn’t even know that their village used to...

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Buky

Posted by on Лют 8, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Buky is a small town in Mankovka district, Cherkassy region. The town’s estimated population is 2,134 (2007). Since 1793 it’s been a part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl of Uman district, Kiev province. Beginning The first mention of Buky in historical record was in 1554. In the early 18th century a synagogue was built in Buky and two more ones in the late XIX. In the 1740’s, count Kiselev sold his Buky-Antonovka estate to duke Liubomirskiy who had attached nearby village Antonovka to Buky. At that time there were 496 households in both settlements. 3,133 people lived there including 260 Jewish households which contained 1,558 people. Jewish population of Buky: 1847 – 1182 Jews 1897 – 2298 (59%) 1923 – 281 Jews 1939 – 546 Jews 1950’s ~ 100 2016...

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Liantskorun

Posted by on Січ 29, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Zarichanka (Liantskorun by 1947), is a village in Chemerovtsy district of the Khmelnitskiy region. The village is located on the river Zhvanchik and the tributary Letavka. In 1793 it was incoperated into the Russian Empire. By the late XIX – early XX century it was a shtetl in Kamenets district of Podolye province. In 1923-1928 it was a district center. According to the census of 2001 its population was 892 people. In 2000 a local resident Ruslan Kozak (born in 1979) tried to write down the history of Liantskorun while he was studying in Kamenets-Podolskiy University. A lot of facts about the life of Jews from Zarechanka were mentioned in his work. Beginning The name Liantskorun appeared in the first half of the XVIII century when the family Liantskoronskiy owned the village and managed to elevate it to the status of a...

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Stepantsy

Posted by on Січ 26, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Stepantsy is a village located in Kaniv district of Cherkassy region. The villag’s estimated population is 2,770 (as of 2007). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was village of Kaniv uezd of Kiev gubernia. Beginning The first mention of Jews in Stepantsy dates back to 1765, when 12 people lived here. In 1845, Stepantsy was bought by Rogozinskiy for his daughter Antonina. She was married to Liudvik Klementyevich Khamets. By 1863, the local population consisted of 2,370 Christians and 3,171 Jews. In 1882, Jews were expelled from the village by the authorities.  Jews could come back to the shtetl only after Kiev trader Iona Zaytsev had rented the land from the local Polish landlord Khamets in 1903. The letter is invitation to wedding in Zolotonosha which was send to Burshtein , Stepantsy from 6 September 1891 (photo...

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Lysianka

Posted by on Січ 25, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Lysianka is district center in Cherkassy region, Ukraine. The city’s estimated population is 8,161 (as of 2001). In the XIX – early XX centuries, it was a shtetl in Zvenigorodka district of Kiev province. Beginning Jews appeared in Lysianka in XVII century. In 1702, The Haydamaky rebels killed almost all the Jews in Lysianka. The Jewish population of Lysianka suffered a lot in 1768 during the period “Koliyivshchyna”. Burials in the Jewish cemetery which date back to 1761 prove the existence of Jews in Lysianka in the XVIII century. By 1867 there were three synagogues in Lysianka and in the 1890s there was a Jewish almshouse. In the 1890s Mordko Teplichnyy was a rabbi, in 1895 Mordko Weitburd was rabbi’s assistant. In 1907 Moyshe Weiserman was the rabbi in Lysianka and in 1914 his role was filled by Meyer-Aron Berkvich Pribysh....

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Tagancha

Posted by on Січ 24, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Tagancha is a village in Ukraine in Kanev district, Cherkassy region. The settlement’s estimated population is 1,413 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Kanev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Beginning Tagancha first appears on the map of the territory adjusted to Kiev in the early XV century. We can assume that Jews appeared in Tagancha at the beginning of the XVI century but there isn’t any documentary evidence. During Bohdan Khmelnitskiy’s uprising (1648-1654) neighboring Kanev was the center of Kanev regiment. The Jewish community was supposedly destroyed by Cossacks during this time. In 1750, the Haydamaky detachment led Aleksey Liakh killed one Jewish trader who served the Polish gentry. This is the first mention in historical record of the Tagancha Jewish community. In 1678, Tagancha became the property of great Polish...

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Zhvanets

Posted by on Січ 14, 2017 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Zhvanets is a town in Kamenets district of Khmelnitskiy region. The town’s estimated population is 1,529 (as of 2001). It is situated on the iver Dniester 20 kilometers away from the district center. It has been a town of Kamenets district since the mid 1920s. Before Revolution it was a shtetl of Kamenets ueazd, Podolia gubernia. Beginning The first mention of  Zhvanets that appeared in historical record was in 1431. In 1646 the town received  Magdeburg right. It is known that there was a conflict between the Jews and bishop Chizhevskiy in 1663. Jewish population of Zhvanets: 1765 – 1134 Jews 1784 – 617 Jews 1847 – 1619 Jews 1897 – 3353 (67% of total) 1902 – 3494 Jews 1923 – 1196 Jews 1926 – 1383 (40,2%) 1939 – 626 Jews 1989 – 5 Jews 1993 – 0 In...

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Khorol

Posted by on Січ 14, 2017 in Poltava region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Khorol is a town in Poltava region, the centre of Khorol district. Its population is 14,643 according to the 2001 census. In the early XX century it was a center of Khorol uyezd (district), Poltava province. Beginning Jews probably first settled in Khorol at the beginning of the XVII century but in 1648 during the Chmelnitsky uprising the local Jewish community was apparently annihilated. Jews settled in Khorol againl in the early XIX century. According to archival data, in 1800, 44 Jewish peasants lived in the town. The revision in 1847 showed that there was a “Khorol Jewish Society” containing 78 people in the region. Jewish population of Khorol: 1897 – 2,056 (25% of total) 1926 – 2,089 (19,7%), 1939 – 701 (6.4%) 2016 ~ 10 Jews According to the 1897 census, more than 173,000 residents lived in the region....

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Olshana

Posted by on Січ 5, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Olshana is a town in Gorodishche district, Cherkassy region. The town’s estimated population is 3,256 (as of 2011). It was established around 1598 and has been a part of the Russian Empire since 1793. In the XIX  – early XX centuries,  it was a shtetl in the Zvenigorodka district, Kiev gubernia. Beginning In 1847, the Jewish community consisted of 689 people, and in 1897 – 1233 (20%). In 1867, a synagogue was functioning in Olshana. Eliezer-Leyb Shapiro (1858-?) was the rabbi in Olshana since 1892. Jewish population of Olshana: 1847 – 689 Jews 1861 – 850 (22%) 1897 – 1233 (20%) 1923 – 916 Jews 1939 – 195 Jews 1993 – 1 Jews 2016 – 0 Crafts and trade were the main occupations of the Jewish population in the 19th – early 20th centuries. In 1914, Jews owned a drugstore and forty-five stalls...

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Boyarka

Posted by on Січ 5, 2017 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Boyarka is a town located in Lisyanka district of Cherkassy region of central Ukraine. Boyarka is located on the Gniliy Tikich River, a tributary of the South Bug. The town’s estimated population is 654 (as of 2009). Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Zvenigorodka yezd, Kiev guberniya. Boyarka is approx. 32 km from Korsun and in 160 km from Kiev. Beginning The first evidence of the Jewish community of Boyarka, dating back to the early XVII century, was found in the Kiev Regional Archive. In 1625, three Jewish families were mentioned in the tax records of Boyarka town. According to the census of 1765, 13 Jewish families were resident in Boyarka. In 1768, as a result of the Haydamaks’ uprising, the number of Jews was down to seven families. Others must have moved to safer locations. The...

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Horodyshche

Posted by on Гру 14, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Gorodische – Городище (Russian), Gorodish, Horodishtch (Yiddish), Horodische – Городище (Ukrainian), Horodyshche, Horodysce, Gorodisce, Gorodyszcze (Alternative Name) Horodyshche is a historic town located in Cherkassy region, center of Horodyshche district. Horodyshche is located on the Vilshanka River, a tributary of the Dnieper. The city’s estimated population is 14,480 (as of 2011). Before Revolution, Horodyshche was a shtetl of Cherkassy County, Kiev Gubernia. Beginning There is no exact information when Jews first settled around the area of modern Horodyshche. However, they must have already lived there during the popular uprising of the Ukrainian peasants when Haydamaks murdered a lot of Polish gentry and Jews. The proportion of Jews among the population of our region increased significantly in the XIX century. More can be found in the archived documents and pre-1917 census and reports. In 1900, there were three synagogues and one...

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Rosava

Posted by on Гру 12, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Россава (Russian), Росава (Ukrainian) Rosava is a village in Mironovskiy district, Kiev region. In the 16th – 18th centuries, it was a part of Rechpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795). In 1793 Rosava became part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX centuries, the shtetl Rosava was in Kanev district, Kiev region.  There are seven documents concerning Jews of Rosava on Wikimedia.org, supplied by an unknown user. It was a main source of information for this article. Beginning We don’t know when Jews appear in Rosava… A synagogue in Rosava was opened in 1815 and existed till its closing in 1864. In 1864, there were about 59 Jewish houses in Rosava. 400 Jews lived in them. In 1866, the synagogue where the followers of tsaddik Duvidl Tverskoy used to pray was closed. There wasn’t any synagogue in the town so...

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Rzhyshchev

Posted by on Жов 31, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rzyszczów (Polish), Ржищев – Rzhishchev (Russian), Ржищів – Rzhyschiv (Ukrainian), אורזישטשב , אורזיטשוב (Yiddish) Rzhyshchev is a town in Kiev district of central Ukraine. The town’s estimated population is 7,519 (as of 2015). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Kiev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Rzhyshchev is 78 km south-east of Kiev. Beginning The Jewish population in Rzhyshchev may have existed at the time of Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795) before the Khmelnitsky uprising but confirmed accounts exist from much later times. Thus, in 1740, 40 Jews lived here. Later, when the Kyiv region became part of the Russian Empire in the 1790s, Rzhyshchev was included in the Pale of Settlement where Russian Jews were allowed to settle. In 1896 there was a Ravinskaya (Rabbi) street in Rzhyshchiv, where one could see the house which belonged to...

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Kovshevatoe

Posted by on Жов 31, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Ківшовата – Kivshovata (Ukrainian), Ковшеватое – Kovshevatoe (Russian) Kovshevatoe is a historic village located in Kiev region of central Ukraine. The village’s estimated population is 2,400 (as of 2001). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Tarasha Yezd of Kiev Gubernia.  Beginning The village was founded in the 1560s by a Polish noble called Chernysh. The first official written evidence dates from the 31st of May 1571 when King Sigismund Augustus confirmed the property rights for “the village Chernyshky called Kovshovatitse” to a boyar (Slav nobility)Tymofiy Tyshkovych from Bila Tserkva. It was a part of Rzeczpospolita (the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795) until the XVIII century when in 1793 it became a part of the Russian Empire. During the war of liberation headed by Bohdan Khmelnitskiy Kivshovate passed from one owner to another several times. We can...

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Korsun

Posted by on Жов 13, 2016 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Korsun’ (Russian), Korsuń Szewczenkowski (Polish), Korsun-Schewtschenkiwskyj (German), Korsun’-Shevchenkovskiy – Корсунь-Шевченковский (Russian), Корсунь-Шевченківський (Ukrainian) Korsun-Shevchenkovskiy (Korsun until 1944) is a town since 1938, a district center in Cherkassy region. It was founded by the Grand Prince of Kiev Yaroslav the Wise in 1032. In 1584, Korsun received the Magdeburg Charter. In the XVI-XVIII centuries it was a part of Kiev Voivodship in Rzeczpospolita (Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795). In 1793 Korsun became part of the Russian Empire. In the XIX – early XX century Korsun was a shtetl in the Kanev Yesd, Kiev province. There were two more towns with large Jewish communities in the Korsun area – Shenderovka and Steblev If you would like to help Korsun Jewish community or Jewish museum please contact Klavdiya Kolesnikova kik-korsun@rambler.ru Beginning The Jews would settle in Korsun in the beginning of the XVII century....

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Novograd-Volynskiy

Posted by on Жов 4, 2016 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 0 comments

Novograd-Volynskiy, Novogradvolynsk, Novograd-Volynsk (Alternative Name), Zvihil, Zvil, Zvehil, זוויל ,זוועהיל, Zvhil (Yiddish), Новоград-Волинський (Ukrainian), נובוהרד-וולינסקי (Hebrew), Zwiahel (Polish), Новоград-Волынский   Novograd-Volynskiy is a historic city located in Zhytomir region, center of Novograd-Volynskiy district. Novograd-Volynskiy is located on the Sluch River, a tributary of the Goryn. The city’s estimated population is 56,155 (as of 2016). Before 1925 it was a сenter of Novograd-Volynskiy yezd, Volyn guberniya. City was mentioned first time in 1257 as Vozvyagel and was renamed to Novograd-Volynskiy after third Poland partition in 1795. Before 1795, city was named Zvyagel.   All information for this article was provided by local historian Leonid Kogan (koganzvil@yandex.com) who research Novograd-Volinskiy Jewish history for more than 20 years. Leonid translated into Russian memorial book “Zvil” (Novograd-Volynsk) which was published in Yiddish and in Hebrew in Israel, in 1962. You can download book here. Beginning First Jews...

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Smotrich

Posted by on Вер 18, 2016 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Smotrich is a historic town located in Dunaevtsy district of Khmelnitskiy region.  The town’s estimated population is 2,087 (as of 2001). During the time of Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569–1795), Smotrich was a town in Podolsk voivodeship (it received the Magdeburg Charter in 1488). Smotrich became a part of Russia Empire in 1795 , in XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Kamenets Yezd of Podolia Gubernia. Smotrich is approx. 32 km from Dunaevtsy and in 280 km from Kamenets-Podolskiy. Beginning By the beginning of 18th century there was a Jewish community in Smotrich. A large synagogue, noted for its beauty, was built there in the 18th century. Jewish population of Smotrich: 1765 – 375 Jews 1847 – 1,274 Jews 1897 — 1,725 (40%) 1939 – 1,075 (18.5%) 2016 ~ 3 In 1712, a Jewish community with...

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Germanovka

Posted by on Вер 1, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Germanovka is a village located in Obuhov district of Kiev. Germanovka is located on the Krasna River. The city’s estimated population is 1,667 (as of 2001). Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Vasilkov yezd, Kiev guberniya. Germanovka is approx. 62km south of Kiev. Beginning While it is thought that Germanovka’s first Jewish community was established in the 17th century and suffered under the Khmelnytskyi pogroms, there is no data available to confirm this. The Jewish community re-appeared in the middle of the XIX century when Germanovka became an important trading centre. A synagogue was built in 1849. In pinkos dating back to 1848, a pogrom of 1881 is recorded. In 1864, the Jewish community of Germanovka numbered 442. In 1891, this number grew to 895. In 1897, the total population of Germanovka was 3,628, and there were 1,049...

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Krasnoe

Posted by on Лип 11, 2016 in Shtetls, Vinnytsia region | 0 comments

Krasnoe is a historic village located in Tyvrov district of Vinnitsya region. Krasnoe is located on the Krasnyanka River, a tributary of the Southern Bug. The village’s estimated population is 1,110 (as of 2001). Krasnoe became a part of Russia Empire in 1793, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Yampol Yezd of Podolia Gubernia. Beginning The Jewish community was first mentioned in the town of Krasnoe in 1605. The area where Krasnoe Jews settled was the older part of the town. During Khmelnytsky Uprising (the Cossack-Polish insurgency in 1648-1654 under the command of Hetman Bohdan Khmelnytsky) the Jewish population in Krasnoe was completely decimated by Khmelnytsky’s Cossack military units. In the first half of the XVIII century, when a revival of the Jewish communities began in Bratslav area, Jewish colonists migrated from different areas to revive the community of Krasnoe. They gradually...

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Dymer

Posted by on Лип 9, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Dimer (Yiddish Transliteration), Dymir (Polish), Димер – Dymer (Ukrainian), Дымер – Dymer, Dimer (Russian), דימער (Yiddish) Dymer is a historic town located in Kiev region. The town’s estimated population is 5,817 (as of 2001). Dymer became a part of Russia Empire in 1793, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Kiev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Dymer is approx. 32 km from Kiev and in 93 km from Chernobyl. Beginning Over the course of several centuries several ethnic groups co-existed on the abundant soil of Dymer. The Jews lived in Dymer since the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth rule. In the XIX – beginning of the XX centuries the Jews were mostly engaged in handicrafts and trade. The Jewish population of Dymer was 273 in 1847. According to the outstanding local historian Lavrentiy Pokhylevych, 1,773 Orthodox Christians of both genders and 624 Jews lived...

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Brovary

Posted by on Тра 15, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Brovary is a city located in Chernigov region of northern Ukraine.  The city’s estimated population is 100,865 (as of 2016). Brovary became a part of Russia Empire in 1667, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Oster Yezd of Chernigov Gubernia. It is approx. 51 km from Kozelets and in 28 km from Kiev. Beginning The Brockhaus-Efron Encyclopaedia notes that Brovary was a mansion settlement with a Cossack population of more than 10 per cent. According to the law of May 14, 1840, Jews were not permitted to settle there; apparently, an 1845 attempt to do so failed. However, in Chapter 55 of the 1866 Respons by the Tzemach Tzedek Menachem Mendel Schneerson, the inhabitants of Brovary are mentioned with regards to a question on the suitability of cereals for Pesach. Therefore, in 1866 (or even earlier, given that the Responsa was compiled...

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Byshov

Posted by on Тра 14, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Byshov is a historic town located in Makarov district of Kiev region. Byshovis located on the Lupa River, a tributary of the Irpen. The town’s estimated population is 2,773 (as of 2001). Byshov became a part of Russia Empire in 1793, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Kiev Yezd of Kiev Gubernia.       The earliest source of data on the Byshiv Jewish community states that there were 142 Jews in the village in 1765. Population numbers peaked in 1864 at 780, and dropped to 597 by 1897 (17% of total population). According to the Brockhaus-Efron Encyclopaedia, in the archives of the town owners in Pashkotz, a document has been preserved in which an Itsko Ozerovich proclaims his free will to swear loyalty in the synagogue. In 1768, the Jews of Byshiv were victims of the Haidamak pogroms. In 1900 there was one synagogue...

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Rykun

Posted by on Кві 26, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Rykun village is a part of Dymer, an urban-type settlement in  Kiev region, Ukraine. It was founded as a Jewish agricultural settlement in Kiev Uezd of Kiev province in 1853. Since the 1980s it has been the village of Dymer district, Kiev region.  The city’s estimated population is 275 (as of 2001). Beginning The origin of the village name is not known. A local historian from Dymer, Grigoriy Alekseenko reckons that Rykun is the surname of one of the first Jewish settlers who came there from Uman. This version was first suggested after a visit of an emigrant descendant from Uman, Jonathan J.Rikoon whose last name is similar to the village name.As a representative of American Heritage Commission, he visited the inauguration of the Holocaust memorial in Dymer in 2011. In 1850 32 families resided in the village, 323 people...

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Boryspol

Posted by on Кві 10, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Boryspol is a historic city located in Kiev region,Ukraine, center of Boryspol district. The city’s estimated population is 60,102 (as of 2013). Boryspol became a part of Russia Empire in 1667, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Pereyaslav Yezd of Poltava Gubernia. Boryspil was first mentioned in the XI century as ‘Lta’, when the son of Prince Vladimir, Boris, died at the river Alta. It is presumed that the modern name appeared during the XVI century, in honor of Saint Boris. It is not known exactly when the Jewish population arrived in the city, although we know that the community suffered during the Khmelnitsky pogroms of the XVI century. Jewish population of Boryspol: 1897 – 1094 (12,2%) 1910 – 955 jews 1923 – 419 jews 1939 – 375 jews 1989 – 68 2010 ~ 40 As in most...

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Khabno

Posted by on Кві 2, 2016 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 4 comments

«… This town is known as Khabnoe. It has everything that you need in a shtetl: the post office, a state-appointed and a local rabbi, the river, telegraph service, a cemetery, a police station, a Talmud Torah, some Hasidim, two synagogues, a lot of poor Jews and a handful of the rich, just like it is in our shtetls.» (Sholom Aleikhem “Khabnoe town”) Кагановичи – Kaganovichi, Kahanovychi (Formerly), Кагановичі Перші – Kahanovychi Pershi (Formerly), Полесское – Polesskoe (Russian), Поліське – Poliske, Polis’ke (Ukrainian), Хабно – Khabno (Formerly) Khabno was a historic town located in Kiev region of northern Ukraine. Khabno was located on the Uzh River, a tributary of the Pripyat. It was renamed Kaganovichi in 1934, and Polesskoye in 1957. Khabnoe became a part of Russia Empire in 1793, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was shtetl of Radomyshl Yezd of...

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Pyriatyn

Posted by on Бер 26, 2016 in Poltava region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Пирятин (Ukrainian), Пирятин – Piriatin (Russian) Pyriatyn is a historic town located in Poltava region of central Ukraine, center of Piriatyn district. Piriatyn is located on the Udai River, a tributary of the Sula. The city’s estimated population is 16,146 (as of 2011). In XIX – beginning of XX century it was center of Piriatyn Yezd of Poltava Gubernia. Piryatin is approx. 44 km from Priluki, 150 km from Kiev and in 47 km from Lubny. Beginning A Jewish community was first recorded in Pyriatyn at the start of the 17th centuryPyriatyn. At the time of ”Khmelnytchina”–a popular uprising led by Bogdan Kmelnitsky–, in 1648, the community was destroyed. By the end of the 17th century the Jews settled in Pyriatyn again. In 19th century rabbi Menakhem-Tuviya, the student of Tsemakh Tsedek, was the rabbi in Pyriatyn. Jewish population of Piryatin: 1802 – 99...

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Justingrad

Posted by on Вер 28, 2015 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Most information about Justingrad was taken from book “Sokolievka/Justingrad: A Century of Struggle and Suffering in a Ukrainian Shtetl”, New York 1983. You can download a text version from Jewishgen or pfd version from my Google Docs. Another book is “Descendants of Candle Maker Kaprove”, Philadelphia, Dorrance 1969 סוקוליבקה ,יוסטינגרד (Yiddish), Justingrad (Formerly called), Justynhrad, Yustingrod (Polish), Загайполь(Russian), Zagaipol, Sokolivka, Юстiнград (Ukrainian) Justingrad is a Jewish shtetl which was completely destroyed in the XX century. Now it is a part of a small Sokolivka village in the Zhashkiv district, Cherkassy region. Current population of Sokolivka is less than 1290 people. Justingrad was approx. 28 km from Zhashkov and in 42 km from Uman. Justingrad was founded in 1825, in the XIX – beginning of the XX century as a shtetl of Lipovets Uyezd of Kiev Gubernia. Sokolivka is a village on the opposite side of the river and...

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Konela

Posted by on Сер 15, 2015 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Koneła (Polish), Конела – Konela (Ukrainian, Russian) Konela is a village located in the Cherkassy region of central Ukraine and a part of Zhashkov district. The village’s estimated population is 601 (as of 2001). Konela is approx. 20 km from Zhashkov, 5 km from Sokolovka and 44 km from Uman. In XIX – beginning of XX century Konela was a shtetl of Lipovets Yezd of Kiev Gubernia A Jewish community existed in Konela from the beginning of the 19th century. Jewish population of Konela: 1847 – 445 Jews 1897 – 744 (36,2%) 1923 – 225 1930’s ~ 100 Jews 1995 – 1 1996 – 0 According to Pokhilevich (needs reference) in the mid-19th century, the population of Konela included 822 Orthodox Christians, 76 Roman Catholics, and 1,360 Jews. This contradicts with the data from the Russian Jewish Encyclopedia which states...

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Zhashkov

Posted by on Чер 15, 2015 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 0 comments

זאשקאוו (Yiddish), Zaszkow (Polish), Жашків (Ukrainian), Жашков (Russian) Zhashkov is a historic city, founded in 1636 and located in the Cherkassy region of central Ukraine and the center of Zhashkov district. The city’s estimated population is 14,116 (as of 2014). Zhashkov is approx. 64 km from Uman, 160 km from Kiev and about 78 km from Talne. The town became a part of the Russian Empire in 1793 after the third Partition of Poland. Before the Revolution of 1917, it was a shtetl of the Tarasha uyezd,  Kiev Guberniya. Beginning The Jewish community of Zhashkiv was first mentioned in the state archives in the 17th century, with several Jewish innkeepers, distilleries and mill owners. In 1863, there were 556 Jews, 1,533 Orthodox Christians and 52 Roman Catholics. In 1897, the Jewish population of Zhashkiv grew to 2,445 residents (47,2%)....

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Sudilkov

Posted by on Тра 6, 2015 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 2 comments

סודילקאוו (Hebrew), Судилків (Ukrainian), Судилков (Russian), Sudyłków (Polish) Much of information for this article was taken from Max Grossman’s personal website. Sudilkov is a village located in the Shepetovka district of Khmelnitski (former Kamenets-Podolski) region. The village’s population is estimated at 5,277 (as of 2007). Sudilkov is approx. 34 km from Polonne and in 280 km from Kiev. In the beginning of the XX century Sudilkov was located about 6 km from Shepetovka but is now a suburb of Shepetovka. The population of Sudilkov has not changed in the XX century due to the extermination of the Jewish population and natural growth within Ukrainian population. The town became a part of the Russia Empire in 1793 after the third Partition of Poland. Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of the Zaslav yezd, Volyn guberniya. Beginning Sudilkov was first mentioned in...

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Shepetovka

Posted by on Бер 29, 2015 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 4 comments

Шепетівка (Ukrainian), Шепетовка – Shepetovka (Russian), שעפּעטיווקע (Yiddish), Szepetówka (Polish), Schepetowka (German),  another pronunciations – Shchepetovka, Schepetiwka, Szepietowka, Sepitivka, Shepetifke Shepetovka is a city located in the Khmelnitskiy region. It is located on the Rivers Guska and Kosetska. The city’s estimated population is 43 661 (as of 2010). Shepetovka is approx. 100 km from Khmelnitskiy and in 270 km from Kiev. The first mention of Shepetivka appears in Polish sources dating from 1594. It was given Magdeburg Rights at the end of the XVI century. We can assume that the first Jewish community of Shepetivka, was destroyed along with Polish population during The Khmelnitskiy Uprising of 1649. Following the Second Partition of Poland in 1793, the city became a part of the Russian Empire. Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Izyaslav yezd, Volyn guberniya. Beginning We can...

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Voroshilovka

Posted by on Лют 27, 2015 in Shtetls, Vinnytsia region | 0 comments

Varshilovka (Yiddish), Vorosilovka (Dutch), Woroszylowka (Polish), Ворошилівка (Ukrainian), Ворошиловка – Voroshilovka (Russian) Voroshilovka is a village located in Tivrov district of Vinnitsya region. It is located on the South Bug River. The village’s estimated population is 1247 (as of 2001). Voroshilovka is approx. 32 km from Vinnitsya and in 280 km from Kiev. Before the Revolution it was a shtetl of Tivrov volost, Vinnitsky yezd, Podol guberniya. This article was insipred by the writings of Michael Charnofsky who emigrated from Voroshilovka before World War I and wrote this charming book in 1960s.   The hard economic and political condition of this small Podolian Jewish shtetl in the beginning of XX century are described here very thoroughly. You can download it by this link. Beginning Jewish population of Voroshilovka: 1765 – 116 jews 1787 – 189 jews 1847 – 1847...

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Oster

Posted by on Гру 25, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Oster (German), Ostor (Yiddish), Ostr (Polish), Остер (Ukrainian), Остер – Oster (Russian), Старогородка – Starogorodka (Old Name) Oster is a historic town located in Kozelets district of Chernihiv region in northern Ukraine. Kozelets is located on the Desna River. The city’s estimated population is 6335 (as of 2011). Oster became a part of the Russian Empire in 1667, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was center of Oster Yezd of Chernigov Gubernia. Jews have lived in Oster since the 18th century. In 1862, there was a wooden synagogue in Oster; in 1867 – two synagogues; in 1886 – four synagogues, of which two were of stone and two of wood. Jewish population of Oster: 1847 – 633 jews 1897 – 1596 (29%) 1910 – 1582 jews 1920 – 1523 jews 1926 – 1267 (18,5%) 1939 – 841 (13,3%) The...

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Gorodnya

Posted by on Гру 10, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Horodna (Polish), Городня (Ukrainian), Городня – Gorodnia (Russian) Gorodnya is a historic town (since 1957) located in Chernihiv region of northern Ukraine, center of Gorodnya district. Gorodnya is located on the Chibrizh River. The city’s estimated population is 12,766 (as of 2011). Gorodnya became a part of Russia Empire in 1667, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was center of Gorodnya Yezd of Chernigov Gubernia. In 1764, more than 300 Jews lived in Horodnia, mostly artisans and merchants. A Jewish burial society existed in Horodnia in 1845. According archival documents a synagogue was erected in the city in 1863. Jewish population of Gorodnya: 1863 — 525 (15,6%) 1886 — 1587 Jews 1897 — 1249 (28,9%) 1920 — 1965 Jews 1926 — 1359 (27,2%) 1939 — 731 Jews 2014 ~ 10 Jews From 1878-1900 the spiritual Rabbi was...

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Mena

Posted by on Лис 19, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Mena (Polish), Myena (German), Мена (Ukrainian), Мена – Mena (Russian) Mena is a historic town located in Chernihiv region of northern Ukraine, center of Mena district. The city’s estimated population is 12,900 (as of 2005). Mena became a part of Russia Empire in 1667, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was center of Mena Yezd of Chernigov Gubernia. Beginning Records from the early 19th century describe the general population in Mena at around 6,000 people. The Jewish population of this time is not mentioned but reference is made to the existence of a synagogue and another Jewish house of worship. According to the 1897 census, 6,277 people lived in Mena, more than a quarter of whom were Jews. The main activities of the Jewish population in the 19th and early 20th centuries were in trade and crafts. In 1902, the...

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Repki

Posted by on Жов 30, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Репки – Repki (Russian), Ріпки (Ukrainian) Repki is a historic town located in the Chernihiv region of northern Ukraine and the center of Repki district. The city’s estimated population is 7,458 (as of 2011). Before the Revolution Repky was a mestechko of Gorodnta Uezd, Chernigov guberniya. Jewish population of Repki: 1897 – 3049 (91,3%) 1939 – 79 2014 – 1 In 1873, there was a synagogue in Ripky. According to the 1897 census, the total population stood at 3,336, including 3,049 Jews. The business directory of 1903 lists few names of Jewish entrepreneurs in Repky: Grocery stores: Aleksandrov Hatsk. Gersh., Glukhovskiy Israil Avram. Haberdashery: Zhezmer Mih. Zalm. In 1905, pogroms took place in the town following the Manifesto of October 18. The town Rabbi  in the beginning of XX century was Shneur-Zalman Schneerson (? – 1928). In 1912, a...

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Korukovka

Posted by on Жов 29, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Most of information obtained for this article was presented by Oksana Tolkachova from the Korukovka historical museum. Korukovka is a historic city located in Chernihiv region of northern Ukraine, and is the center of Korukovka district. It was founded in 1657. Korukovka is located on the Brech River, a tributary of the Snov. The city’s estimated population is 14,805 (as of 2005). In XIX – beginning of XX century it belonged to Sosnitsya Yezd of Chernigov Gubernia. Judging by what we know of Jewish settlement in Sosnitsya Yezd, we can surmise that Jews first appeared in Korukovka at the beginning of XIX century. In 1887 the local sugar factory was bought by Lazar Brodskiy. Brodskiy was famous for his philanthropy. In 1896 he funded the construction of a school and from 1902-1904 a hospital as well as housing for...

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Korop

Posted by on Жов 13, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Korop is a historic town located in the Chernihiv region in the north of Ukraine and is the center of the Korop district. Korop is located on the Desna River. The town’s estimated population is 5,600 (as of 2005). Korop became a part of the Russian Empire in 1667, and in 1796 it was a shtetl in Krolevets Yezd of Malorossia Gubernia and further Chernigov Gubernia. In 1862, there were 218 Jews living in Korop, reaching to over a thousand by 1920, although this figure dropped slightly in the subsequent decade with the Jewish population of 787 in 1926, accounting for some 12% of all Korop residents. Jewish population of Korop: 1865 – 255 1897 – 873 (13,9%) 1910 – 1102 1920 – 1014 1926 – 787 (12,1%) 1939 – 350 (5,6%). In the late 18th century, Korop was...

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Sosnitsa

Posted by on Вер 30, 2014 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Sosnica (Polish), Sosnitza (Yiddish), Sosnyzja (German), Сосница – Sosnitsa (Russian), Сосниця (Ukrainian) Sosnitsa is a historic town located in the Chernihiv region of northern Ukraine and is the center of Sosnitsa district. Sosnitsa is located on the Ubid River, a tributary of the Desna. The city’s estimated population is 7,695 (as of 2014). Sosnitsa became a part of Russia Empire in 1667, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was the center of Sosnitsa Yezd of Chernigov Gubernia. In the 17th century, Sosnytsia,  one of the oldest cities in the Chernihiv region, became a district center. During Khmelnitsky’s uprising, a total expulsion of Jews from Sosnytsia took place. The Jews returned to this area in the early 19th century, when Chernihiv province was included into the Pale of Settlement. According to the census of 1847, the county had...

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