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Berdichev

Posted by on Кві 7, 2014 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 4 comments

Barditchev (Yiddish), Berdicev (Romanian), Berditchev, Berditchov, Berditschew, Berdytschiw, Berdyczów (Polish), Бердичев – Berdichev (Russian), Бердичів (Ukrainian) Berdychiv is a historic city in the Zhytomyr Oblast. How it all began Jews were first mentioned in Berdichev in 1593. Towards the mid-eighteenth century, the city became one of the main Jewish centers of Ukraine, earning the esteemed title “Jerusalem of Volhynia.” From 1785, Berdichev was home to Rabbi Levi Yitzhak of Berdichev, a prominent Hassidic leader, as well as Rabbi Yitzhak Ber Levinzon, a famous advocate of Jewish Enlightenment. In 1797, prince Radziwill granted seven Jewish cloth merchants the monopoly of the cloth trade in Berdichev. In 1798, a Jewish printing press was established in the city, one of the greatest in Russia. The ideas of enlightenment (Haskalah) began to spread in Berdichev early in the 19th century, especially among the...

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Konotop

Posted by on Лип 13, 2012 in Sumy region | 1 comment

Konotop is a city in northern Ukraine within the Sumy Oblast. Beginning At the beginning of the 19th century, only about 80 Jews lived in Konotop, but by 1847 the number had grown to 521. Jewish life in the town during the 19th century is described in memoirs by Pauline Wengerof, who lived there for some years. The numbers increased considerably during the second half of the 19th century as a result of the movement of Jews from the northwestern provinces of the *Pale of Settlement to the southeastern ones, reaching 4,426 (23.5% of the total population) in 1897. In 1892 there was Jewish Hospital. From the 1880 rabbi was Arie-Leib Gaft. Konotop businessmans in 1903: In the end of 19th – beginning 20th century there were 3 synagogues and 3 heders (for 13 boys), Talmud-Tora (for 50 boys) and Jewish school for...

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Belaya Tserkov

Posted by on Лип 10, 2012 in Kiev region, Shtetls | 2 comments

Shvartze Timme (Yiddish Transliteration), Белая Церковь – Belaia Tserkov, Belaya Tserkov (Russian), Біла Церква – Bila Tserkva (Ukrainian), שדה לבן (Hebrew) Belaya Tserkov is a historic city located in Kiev region of Central Ukraine, center of Belaya Tserkov district. Kozelets is located on the Ros’ River, a tributary of the Dnieper. The city’s estimated population is 212,090 (as of 2016). Belaya Tserkov became a part of Russia Empire in 1793, in XIX – beginning of XX century it was a shtetl of Vasylkov Yezd of Kiev Gubernia. Belaya Tserkov is approx. 85 km from Kiev, 38 km from Fastov and 37 km from Skvira. If you want help to Belaya Tserkov Jewish school “Mitzva-613”: in UAH: Р/С 26006060214751; ПАО КБ “Приватбанк”; МФО 321842; ЕДРПОУ 33519562 получатель НВК”Міцва-613″ in USD: Полное название: Branch #10026/0877 Main administration in city Kyiv and Kyiv area...

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Uman

Posted by on Чер 13, 2012 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 2 comments

Human (Hungarian), Humań (Polish), Imen, Human (Yiddish Transliteration), Умань (Ukrainian), Умань – Uman’ (Russian), אמואן (Yiddish) Uman is a city in Cherkassy region. How It Started A Jewish community appeared in Uman in the early 18th century. The first mention of Jews in Uman relates to the events of Haydamaks’ uprising. In 1749 the Haidamacks massacred many Jews of Uman and burned part of the town. In 1761, the owner of Uman, Earl Pototsky, rebuilt the city and established a market, at which time around 450 Jews were living in the city. During this time, Uman began to flourish both as a Jewish town and a trade centre. In 1768 Haidamacks annihilated the Jews of Uman, together with the Jews from other places who had sought refuge there. On June 19, 1788, the peasant revolutionary, Maxim Zheleznyak, marched on...

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Cherkassy

Posted by on Чер 8, 2012 in Cherkasy region, Shtetls | 1 comment

 Cherkasy (Ukrainian: Черкаси, transliterated: Čerkasy, pronounced [tʃerˈkɑsɪ]) or Cherkassy (Russian: Черкасcы), is a city in central Ukraine. It is the capital of the Cherkasy Oblast. There have been Jews in Cherkassy for almost 500 years. Jews settled in the city in the 16th century. However it is known that Jews were in the city previously, from 1487-8, and from 1500. In 1581, Jewish wine merchants were beaten and robbed by Cossacks. In the days of the Decrees of 1647-8 – the Chmelnitsky massacres, Jews fled from the city. The massacres began in June 1648. As the Cossack leader approached the city, in 1664, the local population murdered the Jews and the Poles. After this, no Jews lived in the city until the end of the 17th century. The Jewish community re-appeared in the city at the beginning of the 18th century but suffered greatly from Haidamak attacks. Zhelezniak’s forces captured the...

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