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Liubar

Posted by on 3-22-23

Belohirya

Posted by on 3-21-23

Yampol

Posted by on 3-21-23

Teofipol

Posted by on 3-21-23

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Liubar

Posted by on Mar 22, 2023 in Shtetls, Zhytomyr region | 2 comments

Lieber Tov (Yiddish), Ljubar, Luber, Lubar (Polish), Любар (Ukrainian), Любар – Liubar (Russian) Liubar is a small town on the Sluch River, about 60 km west of Berdychiv and 75 km southwest of Zhytomyr in Zhytomyr region. Majority of the text for this article was taken from the book of “Protecting Memory” project. The first Jews to settle in Liubar may have arrived as early as the 15th century, but their descendants fled the town during the peasant and Cossack uprising in the mid-17th century. Jews did not begin to return to Liubar until 1703. By 1765, the Jewish population had grown to 61, with another 100 Jews in the surrounding villages. Under the terms of the Second Partition of Poland in 1793, Liubar fell to the Russian Empire. There, the town formed a part of the Volhynia Gubernia. In 1847, the population of the Liubar Jewish Community numbered 3,770, a figure that included Jews in the nearby villages. However, according to the first and only census of the Russian Empire, the Jewish population of Liubar rose to 5,435 in 1897. Jews thus made up over 43 percent of the town’s population. In the early 1900s‘, the Jews of Liubar maintained a main synagogue and at least six study houses of learning. The main synagogue,...

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Belohirya

Posted by on Mar 21, 2023 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Belohirya is an urban-type settlement and the district centre in the Khmelnytskyi region. In 2011, the population was 5,483. The settlement is located along the Gorin River. Before 1946, the settlement was known as Lyakhovtsi. Lyakhovtsi was first mentioned in historical documents in 1441. From the 16th to 18th centuries, it was a city in the Kremenets County of the Volyn Voivodeship within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, Lyakhovtsi became a part of the Russian Empire. In the 19th to early 20th century, it was a shtetl in the Ostroh County of the Volyn Governorate. Much more information about Lyakhovtsi can be found in this website. In 1708, the Jews of Lyakhovtsi suffered greatly from raids by Cossack, Swedish, and Russian troops. Representatives of the Jewish population and the bourgeoisie declared on December 5, 1708, that the city had been destroyed. In 1867, there was a synagogue in Belohirya. In 1910, there was a public one-class Jewish elementary school with a crafts department, Talmud-Torah, and a private Jewish male school. I could not find information on the pogroms during the Russian Civil War, but by the 1910s, the town’s Jewish population had decreased by half. I couldn’t found information about Jews of Lyakhovtsi between the WWI and WWII. Holocaust The ghetto in Lyakhovtsi consisted of 2-3 streets on...

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Yampol

Posted by on Mar 21, 2023 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Yampol is a village in the Belogorie district of the Khmelnytskyi region. It should be distinct from Yampol in the Vinnytsia region, as these are two different places. In the 16th and 17th centuries, the village was called Yanushpol. So, likewise, it should be distinct from Yanushpol in the Zhytomyr region. More information about PreWWII Yampol can be found in Yampol memorial book. Yampol was part of the Volyn Voivodeship, Kremenets Powiat, during the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In the early...

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Teofipol

Posted by on Mar 21, 2023 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Teofipol is a town in the Khmelnytskyi district of the Khmelnytskyi region. In 2013, the population was 7686 people. The Jews called this town Tshon. Several short stories about the Jews of Teofipol before the Revolution can be found here. During the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Teofipol was part of the Volhynian Voivodeship, Kremenets Powiat. Teofipol was under the influence of the Kremenets kahal. However, in 1758, a separate kahal was organized in Teofipol and Jews from surrounding villages were subordinated...

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Khmelnik

Posted by on Mar 21, 2023 in Khmelnytskyi region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Khmelnik is a city and the administrative centre of the Vinnitskiy district. As of 2013, the population of the city was 28,217 people. Khmelnik is located on the Southern Bug River, dividing it into Old and New cities. The city was first mentioned in the chronicles in 1363. It was situated 6 km from the Black Road, used by Tatars and Turks during their attacks on Ukraine, and was a gateway to Podolia from the northeast. Therefore, Khmelnik gradually...

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Novye Mlyny

Posted by on Mar 20, 2023 in Chernigov region, Shtetls | 0 comments

Novye Mlyny is a village located in the Nezhin district of the Chernihiv region on the left bank of the Seim River. The population was 905 people as of 2006. During its prime, around 400 Jews were living in Novye Mlyny, and I am describing on this website shtetls where more than 1,000 Jews lived. However, in 2015, I accidentally purchased a book on Amazon called “Mother and Son” by Abram Vilcher. He describes in detail the Jewish town...

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Dzyunkov

Posted by on Mar 16, 2023 in Shtetls, Vinnytsia region | 0 comments

Dzyunkov, a village in the Pohrebyshchensky district of Vinnytsia region (Ukraine). Since 1793, it has been part of the Russian Empire. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, Dzyunkov was a small town in the Berdychivsky district of Kyiv province. In 2022, I visited Dzyunkov in search of any traces of Jews in the village. Instead, the locals showed me the remains of a Jewish cemetery on the slope of a hill on the outskirts of the village with...

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